Qaboos Bin Said al Said, Reign July 23, 1970

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Qaboos bin said became
Sultan of Oman in 23 July 1970 was born, 18 November 1940.
He rose to power after overthrowing his father, Said bin Taimur, in a palace coup in 1970. He is the 14th –generation descendant of the founder of the Al Bu Sa’idi dynasty.
Sultan Qaboos bin Sa’id was born in Salalah in Dhofar on 18 November 1940. He is the only son of Sultan Said bin Taimur and princess Mazoon al-Mashani. He received his primary and secondary education at Salalah and Pune, india where he was the student of Shankar Dayal Sharma, the future President of India and was sent to a private educational establishment in England at age sixteen. At 20 he entered the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. After graduating from Sandhurst, he joined the British Army and was posted to the 1st Battalion. The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles), serving in Germany for one year. He also held a staff appointment with the British Army.
After his military service, Sultan Qaboos studied local government subjects in England and, after a world tour, returned home to Salalah where he studied Islam and the history of his country.
Qaboos acceded to the throne of 23 July 1970 following s successful coup against his father, with the aim of ending the country’s isolation and using its oil revenue for modernization and development, moving to Muscat. There he declared that the country would no longer be known as Musact and Oman, but would change its name to “the Sultanate of Oman” in order to better reflect its political unity.
The first pressing problem that Qaboos bin Said faced as Sultan was an armed communist insurgency from South Yemen, the Dhofar Rebellion (1965-1975). The Sultanate eventually defeated the incursion with help from the Shah of Iran. Jordanian troops sent from his friend King Hussein of Jordan, British Special Forces, and the Royal Air Force.
The political system which Qaboos established is that of an absolute monarchy. Unlike the situation in neighbouring Saudi Arabia, Qaboos’ decisions are not subject to modification by other members of Oman’s royal family. Government decisions are said to be made through a process of decision – making by “Consensus” with provincial, local and tribal representatives, though critics allege that Qaboos exercises de facto control of this process. Qaboos also regularly engages in tours of his realm, in which any citizen with a grievance or request is allowed to appeal to the Sultan in person.
More recently, Qaboos has allowed parliamentary elections (in which women have voted and stood as candidates) and pledge greater openness and participation in government. The parliament enjoys legislative and oversight powers in 1979 Oman was the only Arab state to recognize Egyptian President Anwar Sadat’s peace agreement with Israel.

      A huge banner demanding release of political prisoners is carried by Egyptians in a procession through Cairo streets in 1951 as a three-day 'Hate Britain' campaign is started. It is part of the Egyptian attempt to get the British out of Egypt and the Egyptians into the Sudan. Most of the political prisoners are members of the Moslem Brotherhood. (AP Photo)
A huge banner demanding release of political prisoners is carried by Egyptians in a procession through Cairo streets in 1951 as a three-day ‘Hate Britain’ campaign is started. It is part of the Egyptian attempt to get the British out of Egypt and the Egyptians into the Sudan. Most of the political prisoners are members of the Moslem Brotherhood. (AP Photo)