Connect with us

Opinion

Improving Nigeria’s Education System

Published

on

In X-raying the problem bedeviling the Nigerians
education sector, you would notice that it needs holistic remedy to make it what society expects of it.
According to British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) English Dictionary,  education consists of teaching people various subjects at a school or college. Education is also, the process through which a person is taught better way of doing something or a better way of living.
Hence, education encompasses any form of learning which transform and addrvalue to an individual’s life which should lead to the benefit of his family and society at large.
The fact that the Nigerian Government institutions of higher learning run courses that are not accredited speaks volumes of the administrative anomaly in our schools.
However, most students enroll into various schools to study Law,
Engineering, Medicine and Economics and so on. Perhaps, they see these courses as the best selling professions that is, a profession that can lead to gainful employment easily after graduation. This is so because most Nigerian students believe that the Nigerian environment only favours certain professions and they lack proper counseling.
Meanwhile, there are other selling professions like those in the environmental option like estate management, surveying which could enable graduates become self-employed. For instance a pupil in primary school could say be wants to become doctor without knowing what is required of him before he could be qualified to study such course later in tertiary institution. Such a child when he later gets admission into a secondary school may not be able to cope with the science subjects that would enable him study the career he initially wished for. Today, much emphasis is placed on trained teachers to teach in schools that is, teachers with relevant educational qualifications. This has triggered countless persons to bribe their way through school in order to get certificates. Yet, not all trained teachers have the adequate knowledge to impart knowledge, thus bribery and corruption has become the order of the day.
However, to create the much needed social balance and beat unemployment now ravaging the youth there is need to upgrade technical schools to offer training in various skills.
It is toward breaking the youth unemployment yoke that the learning environment for acquisition should be encouraged with foreign partnership. This would go a long way to decongest the population of students enrolling in our universities, in addition to reducing the number of unemployed youth.
Robert Owen, who may be regarded as an environmental determinist believes that environmental conditions determine individual destinies and to improve the lot of the individuals, any reformer must start with recreating the environment to favour the individual.
Now, how do we recreate the environment in our various institution of higher learning to favour these individuals? Bearing in mind that components of the environment or facilities in the environment make up what is referred to as the environment. How do we put Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) strike under control knowing really well that strike is a right of every labour union.
In juxtaposing the view of the English Clergy, Reverend Thomas Malthus in his book, “Essay on the Principle of Population” where he asserted that the population was growing more than the rate at which food is supplied it becomes clear that our student’s population is growing more than the available educational facilities.
The fact that students population is continuously out-growing educational facilities in Nigerian Institutions brings with it economic back-lash as many are unemployed and these unemployed persons in order to obey the natural law of survival go into crime as the only way to keep food on their table. This goes a long way to slow down Government policy of the day.
As a result poverty keeps increasing and when proper measures are not taken to correct this imbalance then, Darwin’s Theory of Succession sets in such that it is only the strongest that survives. The big question is what should be done to correct this imbalance whereby the Nigerian student’s population grows faster than educational facilities?
In Nigeria, birth and death registration lack proper documentation, this accounts for ghost workers being paid salaries while many persons including graduates remain unemployed.
However, should birth registration be done electronically alongside fingerprints and passport photograph of Nigerians in such a way that their data becomes accessible through the internet in similar way information is sourced through .goggle, this would help to reduce fake declaration of age certificates of workers in government parastatals and other firms, and create room for youth employment.
Enyi is a social commentator.

 

Thank-God Wonukwuru Enyi,

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Opinion

Abia’s Burden Of Prejudice

Published

on

Prejudice, defined as preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual evidence, like cynicism and pessimism, is weighty and burdensome. Prejudice is cancerous. It breeds discontentment and leaves one disconcerted. It also negates sound judgment and makes the victim forlorn.
Cyril, a real friend (though in pseudonym), has gone mad again!
Cyril reminds me of David’s outcry in Psalms 135:16-18: “They have mouths, but they speak not; eyes have they, but they see not; they have ears, but they hear not; neither is there any breath in their mouths. They that make them are like unto them: so is every one that trusted in them.”
Prior to the 2015 and 2019 General Elections, respectively, Cyril would not hear anything good about the candidature of Governor Okezie Ikpeazu of Abia State. He loathed him with passion and wouldn’t give him a chance. When I engaged Cyril, then, he had his prejudiced views though laced with “they say…”
Cyril, like his kinds, has never met Ikpeazu and knows little or nothing about him. They read no positive news about Abia State; even when they do, they mock the success stories and hype the failures! Like the Man Friday that they are, they take in hook, line and sinker, every negative media propaganda in disfavour of Abia State.
On the expiration of Gov. Ikpeazu’s first term, I met Cyril to seek his appraisal of the four-year term… True to his type, Cyril was still bitter!  Why? I asked him…even with the landmark road infrastructure…over 70 finished roads? Over 300 renovated schools? Manpower development? Cyril wouldn’t hear any of these achievements. He was adamant. “Ikpeazu has done nothing…” he thundered! He is not good enough to rule Abia State… I knew he will fail and he has failed…” He enthused, rather comically. Hmm! I pressed on to know his reasons for such hatred but my friend couldn’t explain to me. I concluded he had no reason other than sheer prejudice and an unmitigated urge for malfeasance!
I fast forward to last month…I called on my friend Cyril, once again, to know if his impressions about Gov. Ikpeazu has changed. I drew his attention to the Osikapa (Rice Mill) revolutions and the fact that we have our brand of rice everywhere in Abia State. I told him of the Poultry Clusters in Umuosu and the cheering 1000 CBN trainees already engaged. I informed him of the state -of – the -art, ongoing machinery installations at the Automated Shoe factory…and what I thought was a piece of good news …that the 30 China trainees will have a place to practise their skill. Even the fact that they are already involved in the installation activities, did not mean anything to Cyril!
I reminded Cyril of the attendant benefits of these low cost, pro-poor but landmark infrastructural provisions of the Ikpeazu government. I did tell him of the value chain benefits of these poultry clusters and the automated shoe factory, but Cyril wouldn’t budge. His reasons… Ikpeazu is a failure! Ikpeazu must fail …Ikpeazu is bound to fail!
Haba, Cyril! You mean there is nothing cheering in all that the Governor has achieved in less than one year of his second term?
Maybe I can heal Cyril’s maniacal disorders, I thought. I took Cyril to Osusu Road in Aba that was fixed recently and told him also that the government has asked Setraco to return to Faulks Road and complete the work for commissioning. I reminded him of the Umuene-Umuoba Road. I also informed him that Golden Guinea Breweries has begun full-scale production just as Arab Contractors is speedily working on the Umuahia-Ubakala-Aba Road.
Still, Cyril remained cynical!
Since Cyril is worried for health/social infrastructural deficit. I informed Cyril about the Telehealth Initiative…an amazing, ingenious innovation of Gov. Ikpeazu’s.
I lectured Cyril on the imports of the scheme: just dial a number and a doctor will attend to you! No need to take a bed in the hospital. No need struggling with the logistics of transportation and all that. Above all, it is powered by the renowned Globacom and the scheme has already kicked off!
I reminded Cyril that the social investment thrust of Gov Ikpeazu entails an equitable distribution of resources bottom up, through needful empowerment and skills acquisition programmes, and the consolidation of wealth through the provision of infrastructure and other enablers like security, etc.
I took Cyril to my village in Umunkwo Ikem Nvosi in Isiala Ngwa South Local Government Area and showed him our Village Hall built through the CSDP/World Bank intervention grants. I informed him that, for laudable feats as this, the World Bank just recently gave kudos to Abia State for their diligence in managing the World Bank-assisted projects in the state. I thought Cyril will change his mind but all he could do was to sigh, hiss and in acquisance murmured …and so what?
Thereafter, Cyril walked away!
Inukwa…! Is Cyril under a spell?
Although my list is longer, I couldn’t stand the inanity of Cyril’s cynicism.
Cyril is, therefore, a metaphor of Abians who see nothing good in the achievements made by Ikpeazu with the little resources at his disposal. Cyril captures the picture of the few Abians who are quick to celebrate mediocre projects in other states but lampoon excellence in their state.
Cyril is “Everyman” that is in enmity with everything progressive. Cyril represents “Everyman” whose actions or inactions are antithetical to the systematic, impactful, pro-poor projects of the Ikpeazu administration.
Cyril is you …ndi Abia cynics …ndi ekweghi ekwe Abia that see nothing good in Ikpeazu’s spirited efforts to transform Abia State.
Maybe I should reiterate it, once more; Abia State is work-in-progress. We are not near our destination but we have covered some milestones!
Given your encouragements, co-operation, albeit responsible criticisms, the trajectory will be nothing but progressive progressions; Onward ever, backward never!
Would you rather let go of that impedance called prejudice and embrace objectivity? Would you rather shift from that paradigm of darkness unto the sunny side of life?
If you can’t see, can’t you feel it?
The sign is everywhere… that Ikpeazu won’t leave us the way he met us!
Onyenma is Special Assistant to Abia State Governor on Strategic Development

 

By: Kennedy Onyenma

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Opinion

Buhari’s Foreign Loans: Matters Arising

Published

on

President Muhammadu Buhari sought for legislative approval for external loans during the 8th Senate but was turned down. Amongst them was US$29.96 billion loan which, according to the object, was to fund critical infrastructure in the country. The Senate bawled that loans cannot be an option at all. Superficially, the Senate was right in a part on account of daily mega inflows to the economy. Inarguably, the country is sufficiently rich to be self-reliant for most capital projects, all things being equal.
On the other hand, the Senate stumbled knowing that the major drain pipe in the country is the Senate and its counterpart, the House of Representatives. The funds allocated to these two chambers are sufficient to fund robust infrastructure across the nation with ease. From record, Nigeria’s lawmakers are the highest paid in the world and with outrageous allowances. To review these anomalies and possibly scrap one of the chambers; either Senate or lower chamber remain a way forward.
On the foreign loans, first and foremost, it is imperative to distinguish between loans for recurrent expenditure or sustenance and that of infrastructure development. The former is an index of economic recession. On the other hand, most developed countries didn’t fund capital projects from money in the treasury but long-term infrastructure loans. To put the burden on funds in the treasury can slow down developments and negatively affect other operations.
Noticeably, President Buhari’s government has created secure revenue for the nation. Amongst them are the Treasury Single Account (TSA), Value Added Tax (VAT), other internally-generated revenues that are active. Above all, leakages in the economy have been substantially blocked which makes government to get more incomes unlike before.
Beyond doubt, Nigeria has low tax morale – apathy on payment of taxes due to high level of corruption among the ruling class. For example, it was revealed by the Research Director of the Fiscal Policy Roundtable of the Nigerian Economic Summit Group (NESG), Tayo Oyedele at the Nigeria Governors’ Forum Secretariat, Abuja recently that more than 81% of taxable adults and businesses in Nigeria do not pay their income tax. According to him, only 20 million out of nearly 200 million people do.
Suffice it to say that the ruling class must vitally restore peoples’ confidence by good leadership. For instance, during the tenure of Babatunde Fashola (SAN) as Lagos state governor, many residents enthusiastically paid taxes on account of visible transformations in the state. After his exit, perceptively, the narratives changed.
Hence, adequate revenue through taxes may not be a realistic option at the moment. The second option is concessionary technique whereby companies bid and execute projects with trade agreement; to manage infrastructure for a specified period for the purpose of recouping invested capital. Incidentally, concession of sensitive infrastructure may not augur well for the masses presently due to poverty level albeit a unique conventional template.
Back to the discourse, any government that has a secure revenue system; capacity to repay can comfortably opt for loans for infrastructural development. This is because the loans can be prudently tied to the secure inflows for settlements. There would be issues where a government has no secure means of reimbursement but liberally securing loans, which is indicative of bad governance as witnessed in the past when government relied only on crude oil.
From the record, the 2016-2018 External Borrowing Plan targeted 39 projects spread across the country which includes the East-West Road; Mambilla Hydro Power Station; Standard gauge Ibadan-Kano Rail line; Calabar-PH-Aba-Makurdi-Bauchi-Maiduguri Rail Line; 2,500 Km Power Transmission Lines and Power Transformers across Nigeria; total overhauling of Ajaokuta Steel Company and Dualization of Lokoja-Okene-Auchi-Benin Road. Thus, the loan apart from being secured is tied to infrastructure unlike the previous loan regimen.
President Buhari has presented the $29.96billion loan request to the 9th Senate for approval. Instructively, lawmakers must, above all, be guided by objectivity and public interests rather than unnecessary show of power. The sensible action is to evaluate the capacity of the government vis-à-vis repayment by its protected revenue machinery in place and not fear of being labelled rubberstamped legislature.
Economically, it is naïve to scream over loans without first considering the object and capacity of the borrower. Without making use of loan facility, the country will spend much time in planning without executions. Democracy is a time-frame system; therefore, if an administration must rely solely on available funds in the treasury, nothing substantial may be achieved in the four years an administration is billed to last.
In other words, it is immaterial the volume of loans as long as there is a secure repayment mechanism and the objects are germane. Such arrangement will equally reduce corruption as inflows will be directed to repayment schedules. Interestingly, the Constitution clothed the lawmakers with oversight functions which empowers them to supervise executive’s activities. Hence, there’s no cause for alarm. To decline loan request for infrastructural development simply for apprehension of misappropriation is gullible.
The grumble is comparable to a woman scared of pregnancy to avoid giving birth to a bad child when it is her duty as a mother to mould the child to become useful. An executive arm cannot misappropriate funds where the lawmakers that exercise oversight functions are active, awake and responsible. Besides, President Buhari, as the team leader, is arguably not characterized by such character of dishonesty, greed and imprudence.
Umegboro is a public affairs analyst.

 

By: Carl Umegboro

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Opinion

Toeing The Path Of Welfarism

Published

on

In this era of globalization, market economy, hyper competition and rapid changing environment, every employer of labour expects an increase in productivity, a surge in quality service delivery as well as critical thinking in workplaces. Unfortunately, not all understand the Human Resource philosophy which states that “employees are an important business resource that must be managed carefully in order to maximize return on investment and achieve business objectives”.
Instead, many employers tend to portray their employees as a folk privileged to have a paltry sum on a regular basis. Of course, the unprecedented surge in the labour market has not helped matters, as workers are forced by their economic situation to see their employers as lords, in whose grace they have found solace. This mentality has not only led the country into serious brain-drain of its workforce, it has affected the overall attitude to work and, by extension, the overall productivity.
This is not different from what is being observed as the battle for the full implementation of the New National Minimum Wage for workers, moved to the various states of the federation.
Upon the Federal Government’s conclusion of negotiations on consequential adjustments of salaries of higher income earners with the Joint National Public Service Negotiating Council (JNPSNC), as a result of the new minimum wage of N30,000, expectations were that respective state governors would see reason to implement same immediately, considering the length of time it took for the negotiations to be concluded.
Ordinarily, 182 days after President Muhammadu Buhari signed the new minimum wage bill into law, before the consequential adjustment was achieved, should have been time enough for a welfare-conscious leader to know that the concerned workers’ patience had been overstretched, and so, needed no further stretching.
No doubt, salivating Nigerian workers had been very anxious for the new salary which they hope would shore up their purchasing power, given the current economic realities. The more optimistic among them had already calculated the possible new earnings and had possibly started looking forward to when they would start enjoying the jumbo pay.
After all, the Federal Executive Council (FEC) that ratified the deal, had directed “…that the National Salaries, Income and Wages Commission and the Ministry of Labour and Employment should send the consequential adjustments table down to the state and local governments as an advisory document for their information and guidance for their National Joint Public Service status in their respective states because the national minimum wage is a national law.”,
On the contrary, most state workers are yet to know their fate, a situation that isn’t palatable at all. Not even are the state governors moved by the directive to the ministries, agencies and departments to ensure that arrears of the new wage regime from April when the Act came into effect be cleared before the end of December.
This blattant display of reluctance towards the implementation of this federal law (minimum wage), with the required urgency, by the various state governors, does not only express the height of the latter’s insensitivity to the plight of their subjects, it is an indication of a lack of love for those whose wellbeing they swore to protect.
It is on this note that the action of the Lagos State Government under the leadership of Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu, at not only being the first state to pay the minimum wage, but also raising the bar by paying more than the N30, 000 agreement which organized labour reached with the Federal Government, is highly commendable.
According to Jeddy Omisore, a journalist, “with this singular action, Gov Sanwo-Olu has painted his self portrait as a welfarist leader. He has proved that it is possible to be in power and still remember the downtrodden. He has, no doubt, written his name in gold as a foremost civil servants-friendly governor”.
Right now, there are reports that pensioners are also getting a review on their earnings, just as the state continues to pay them as at when due. Lagos State is generally applauded as one of the few states that do not make pensioners groan, grumble or cry before they collect their pension.
Sanwo-Olu may have been able to achieve this feat due to his belief in collectivism and his understanding of the fact that the next person also has a right to fair treatment for a harmonious co-existence, especially when productivity is expected from the latter.
Nothing can be more reinforcing than this laudable action of the governor. It is now imperative on the public servants to reciprocate with more hard work, dedication and selfless service. As they say, unto whom much is given, much is required. The onus now lies on the public servants in the state to roll up their sleeves, with their hand to the till, their back to the wall and nose to the grindstone and work smarter and harder than before.
In both private and public sectors, while every other measure may count, employees’ performances remain an essential requirement for any organization to maintain its efforts towards the realization of predetermined goals. Those who have come to terms with this principle would affirm that regular welfare packages remain a known catalyst for this expected improved performance, and so, it is not optional.
Many employers have failed because they chose to undermine their workers’ welfare; the catalyst of improved performance in the workplace. In fact, in this age and era, it is almost impossible to operate an organization without offering basic benefits for employees’ welfare. This is due to the realization that a healthy and stress-free worker is a major asset.
Thus, regular upward review of workers’ remunerations is one welfare facility known to basically keep employees’ motivation levels high. Besides, it is merely a social responsibility on organizations for those who work for them. The very logic behind providing welfare schemes, apart from being the workers’ right, is to increase a healthy employer/employee relationship as well as the productivity of the organization. It is also to create an efficient and satisfied labour force, thereby maintaining industrial peace. It should not be seen as a grant given to some undeserving elements of the society.

 

By: Sylvia ThankGod-Amadi

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Continue Reading

Trending