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Curbing Underage Prostitution

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Needless to say, the reality of child abuse and prostitution is an apodictic phenomenon in Nigeria, as in many developing and developed countries. This development has become an agonising threat, with multiple correlated implications, in addition to denying the fundamental rights and dignity of children as acknowledged in the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.
The attention this incident draws is based on the awareness of the prominence of children in families and societies as future generations and leaders of tomorrow. And as potential standard-bearers of any nation, they need to be properly cared for and nurtured, thereby providing an enabling environment for them to develop their potential to take on such great responsibilities.
Child prostitution has devastating consequences for children individually and society as a whole. Undermining these consequences can lead to serious and far-reaching problems, not only for individuals but for society as well. To address the threat, law enforcement agents have been conducting raids on brothels and residences across the country to apprehend those involved in the dastardly act.
For example, the police in Lagos State emancipated 24 ladies including a 13-year-old who were trafficked from Akwa Ibom State for prostitution. Four members of the syndicate that brought the girls, most of them from Oron in Akwa Ibom, were also arrested. The trafficked girls were rescued in shanties used as hotels around an abattoir area at Agege. Preliminary investigations revealed that the traffickers charged men N2,000 to sleep with the girls who were then given N5,000 at the end of the month.
Furthermore, the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP) arrested eight underaged girls in Benin, the Edo State capital, for allegedly contravening section 17 of the Agency’s Act. The arrest was made by the Benin Zonal Command of the agency, comprising Edo and Delta States. The arrest of the underaged girls followed a raid on two brothels in the Aduwawa axis of the state.
Similarly, the Rivers State Police Command recently said its operatives rescued three underaged girls and arrested three male suspects during a raid on a brothel at Azikiwe Street, Mile Two, Diobu, Port Harcourt, the state capital. Policemen from Rumuolumeni alerted the Azikiwe Police Division following a complaint from a relative of one of the underaged girls, who was compelled into prostitution. The list is endless.
Nigeria has numerous underaged girls living and making a living in the streets. This has been attributed to economic factors and exposure to all forms of risks. The result is the proliferation of prostitution among young people, with its attendant problems. The causes of child prostitution in the country are largely economic, sociological, and socioeconomic factors. The effects of prostitution are psychological reactions, psychosocial damage, and political implications, which dent the nation’s image.
NAPTIP recently lamented that about 60 per cent of the female sex hawkers in Italy were Nigerians. It described the situation as not only pathetic but “highly unacceptable.” In other words, there is no question about whether the population of Nigerian girls who are engaged in sex hawking in the European country is sizeable because it is indeed significantly so. This is awful and constitutes a monumental national embarrassment.
By the agency’s disclosure, it is evident that many of the federal and state governments’ intervention schemes to curb underage prostitution have been largely ineffective and inadequate. Many wives of the heads of subnational governments are also known to have pet projects whose objectives are partly woven around the curtailment of this menace, but those projects too have failed to achieve the desired results. This is disconcerting.
Many young Nigerians are discontented, and some of them do considerable atrocious things to survive. However, while it is true that the seemingly intractable socioeconomic challenges of the country pose a veritable allurement for people to take precipitate actions to survive, there are also the issues of weak moral fabric and warped value system that make some young people and adults alike to disparage ethical, moral and sometimes legal abuttals in their quest for survival.
The questions are: how did we get to this contemptible state? How come that young girls who ought to be at school are flaunting the major streets of Abuja, Lagos, Port Harcourt, Enugu, Ibadan and other cities, hawking their half-naked bodies to any willing buyer? Why has sex become the fad among many students of our institutions? Where lies the future of these young ladies, and what can society do to protect their nobility?
More irksome is the all-embracing organised sex trafficking, even within the country. Many young Nigerian girls are being trafficked from one state of the federation to the other just for sex. Recent research conducted by Sympathy Worldwide Foundation, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) fighting sex slavery and child trafficking, reveals that several young girls are being trafficked from the hinterland to the cities but as the promises of their “do-gooders” fail, the girls take to the streets to use the same means to help themselves.
We call on the government at all levels, anti-prostitution NGOs, parents, churches, mosques, the police and all relevant stakeholders to take concrete steps to end prostitution which is still a crime in our law. People trading in prostitution or keeping brothels should be prosecuted, while men patronising, defiling or seducing our young girls should be brought to justice. The relevant authorities should also intensify their spirited campaigns against the illicit act.
Since poverty and unemployment are the major causes of prostitution, our governing authorities should stop paying lip service to these deprivations. The family institution needs to be re-invigorated. If parents were at home performing their parental obligations, their daughters would probably not have taken to the streets. Nigeria possesses an enviable rich cultural and religious heritage which includes living a chaste life and respect for the body and soul.
We have ascertained that neighbourhood and peer influence, weak financial, emotional and spiritual support, and molestation experience are some causes of child prostitution. We all must deploy strategies to massively generate awareness of the consequences of engaging in multiple sexual acts among the girl-child. This will help dishearten potential child prostitutes in the country.

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Editorial

Towards Cutting Cost Of Governance

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After many years in limbo, the Federal Executive Council (FEC) has given approval to the 2012 Steve Oronsaye Committee Report, which suggests merging, scrapping or subsuming certain ministries, departments, agencies (MDAs) and commissions of the government with similar functions. The approval was given at the FEC meeting on Monday, February 26. This decision is aimed at reducing the cost of governance and improving efficiency within the government.
The administration of former President Goodluck Jonathan, which established the committee in 2011, did not follow through with the recommendations. Instead, it issued a White Paper to show executive acceptance. Similarly, former President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration released a White Paper on the report and made efforts to put it into action. However, it later reversed course after taking a few initial steps, leading to the consolidation of few government agencies.
Recall that the Oronsaye committee submitted a report consisting of 800 pages on April 16, 2012. The report on public sector reforms revealed that there are 541 Federal Government parastatals, commissions, and agencies and suggested that 102 agencies and parastatals should be abolished or merged, while others were suggested to be self-funding. The committee identified a significant amount of competition among multiple overlapping agencies. This competition not only caused resentment among government agencies but also led to unnecessary wastage of funds.
Also recommended by the committee, among other things, was the stoppage of government funding for professional bodies and councils. The main aim of these measures was to prudently allocate funds for essential infrastructure projects all over the country. Oronsaye’s report received a mixed response as job cuts were expected. But, many people believed that despite the impact on agencies and individuals, the civil service would become stronger and more efficient.
A statement signed by the Special Adviser on Information and Strategy to President Tinubu, Bayo Onanuga, in Abuja, provided the details of the resolutions reached during the FEC meeting. According to Onanuga, an eight-man committee had a 12-week deadline to ensure that the necessary legislative amendments and administrative restructuring needed to implement the reforms were effected efficiently.
Among the principal suggestions are the inclusion of the National Salaries, Income and Wages Commission under the Fiscal Commission and Revenue Mobilisation departments. The Bureau of Public Enterprise will merge with the Infrastructure Concession and Regulatory Commission, renaming it the Public Enterprises and Infrastructural Concession Commission. Public Complaints Commission and National Human Rights Commission will merge.
The report proposes the restructuring of several agencies, including the scrapping of the Pension Transitional Arrangement Directorate (PTAD), merging the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and National Commission for Refugees into the National Emergency and Refugee Management Commission, and renaming the Border Communities Development Agency as a department under the National Boundary Commission. The report also consolidates the Code of Conduct Bureau, Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, and Independent Corrupt Practices and Related Offences Commission as National Anti-Corruption Commission.
The Federal Ministry of Science will oversee a new agency combining NCAM, NASENI, and PRODA, while the National Commission for Museums and Monuments and Gallery of Arts will merge into a single entity. The National Theatre will become one with National Troupe, and the Directorate of Technical Cooperation in Africa and Directorate of Technical Aid Corp will unite under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, among others.
We applaud the Tinubu administration for taking bold steps to address high governance costs by incorporating recommendations from the Orosanye report. In a time when many Nigerians are facing challenges and the economy is showing signs of weakness, reducing the expenses associated with governance will help redirect resources to areas of greater need and stimulate economic growth.
It is truly heartwarming to see that after many years of hesitation and a lack of political will to take the necessary actions to achieve the desired results, especially following the release of the Jonathan and Buhari White Papers on the report, the Federal Government has finally recognised the importance of fully implementing the recommendations of the Oronsaye report on civil service reform.
This report should be implemented without further delay, as many MDAs are not only draining the economy but were established for political purposes. The funds saved from the consolidation and elimination of these agencies could be better utilised to establish industries and create employment opportunities across the country. The industries should be self-sustaining, reducing the need for annual budgetary allocations.
There is a fear that implementing the report could lead to mass layoffs of workers. But the Federal Government has assured Nigerians that genuine employees of the affected MDAs would be redeployed to appropriate offices without any job losses. We hope that the Federal Government will see this task through. While the assignment may seem challenging, it is definitely achievable with determination. This is an area the Tinubu government can make a positive impact. And if religiously implemented, it obviously will help cut down the cost of governance to save scarce resources and funds for areas of critical need. This is the right way to go!

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Editorial

Towards Sustainable Tourism In Nigeria 

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In a resolution passed on February 6, 2023, the UN General Assembly declared February 17, to be Global Tour-
ism Resilience Day. The resolution emphasised the importance of encouraging sustainable tourism development. The disruptive and critical effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the travel and tourism sector informed this decision. Additionally, it drew upon precedent UN resolutions, conferences, and agendas highlighting environmental sustainability and bolstering industry resilience.
Tourism is a vital industry that contributes to sustainable development and the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in developing countries. It provides income, foreign currency earnings, tax revenue, and employment, and connects people with nature, promoting environmental responsibility and conservation. This cross-cutting industry is particularly beneficial for Africa and middle-income countries.
Sustainable tourism, including ecotourism, promotes economic growth, poverty alleviation, employment, and decent work. It accelerates lasting consumption, promotes sustainable use of oceans and marine resources, and enhances local culture. It improves the quality of life for women, young people, indigenous communities, and rural populations, ultimately contributing to the achievement of the SDGs.
Utilising endurable and resilient tourism as a means to promote continuous and inclusive economic growth, social development, and financial inclusion facilitates the formalisation of the informal sector. It also supports domestic resource mobilisation, environmental protection, the elimination of poverty and hunger, as well as the conservation and tenable utilisation of biodiversity and natural resources. Moreover, sustainable tourism encourages investment and entrepreneurship in the industry.
Tourism plays a vital role in supporting numerous direct and indirect employment opportunities globally, especially benefiting women and young individuals. In certain small island nations and developing economies, tourism makes up more than 20 per cent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The economic impact of tourism, indicated by the tourism direct GDP, was calculated at $1.9trillion in 2021, surpassing the $1.6trillion reported in 2020. However, it still remains lower than the pre-pandemic figure of $3.5trillion.
Tourism is a rapidly growing global economic sector, and destination countries must develop it sustainably to maximise benefits. Nigeria, with its vast geography, cultural diversity, and historical sites, has established tourism ministries to capitalise on its potential. The country’s landscape holds great potential for a sector that can compete with black gold in terms of foreign exchange earnings, making it an attractive destination for tourists.
However, owing to the considerable financial gains obtained from the oil industry, tourism, along with other sectors of our economy such as agriculture and solid minerals, has been severely overlooked. For instance, the annual Osun Osogbo Festival and the Calabar Carnival have been sustained; thanks to the dedicated initiatives of private sector contributors. These events have propelled the city of Calabar into international recognition in recent years.
The previously lively Argungu Fishing Festival, the renowned Argungu Motor Rally, the Yankari Game Reserve, the Jos Wildlife Park, the Olumo Rock, the Asop Falls, and the boat regatta in the coastal regions of Nigeria, particularly Opobo and Andoni, have all seen a decline.
In contrast, the Elmina Slave Castle in Ghana remains a popular destination for tourists seeking to learn about the tragic history of trans-Atlantic slave trade victims. Monuments in Nigeria such as those in Calabar, Lagos, and Badagry are gradually losing their significance in the global tourism landscape.
The Mambilla Plateau, Gashaka-Gumti Game Reserve, Ngel-Nyaki Forest Reserve, and Taraba’s indigenous festivals are potential tourism destinations that could generate revenue comparable to Nigeria’s oil sector earnings. Proper promotion of these attractions could boost the states’ economies and improve their status as one of the poorest in Nigeria. Yobe and Borno states also have the Dagona Birds Sanctuary, attracting diverse bird species from Europe, North America, Australia, and Asia.
Several key landmarks showcase Nigeria’s rich history and potential, such as the 8,000-year-old Dafuna Canoe, the Tulo-Tulowa – dubbed the ‘Desert Land of Hope,’ – as well as the shrinking Lake Chad, which could have thrived as a critical tourist and economic centre. More could have been done by the government to preserve and support these treasures.
The pertinent government bodies must safeguard our biodiversity by penalising those who partake in haphazard bush burning and deforestation. The government should increase funding for infrastructure development and showcase Nigerian tourism attractions globally on international media platforms and embassies. There should be private sector involvement. The authorities should also intensify efforts to tackle security challenges in areas that could negatively impact the sector, such as terrorism, armed banditry, kidnapping, and other allied crimes. Tourists would not visit a country suffering acute security challenges, despite the attractiveness of its tourism destinations.
To address spending deficits and inflation, diversifying the economy is crucial. Tourism, with its substantial revenue sources, can fund government policies and programmes. States like Rivers can use tourism to stimulate economic growth, create new jobs, and foster community connections. This initiative will boost revenue, fuel developmental efforts, strengthen social bonds, and promote peace and cultural unity.
Exploring new investment opportunities in tourism in areas like Port Harcourt, Bonny, Andoni, Opobo, Kono, Okomoko, Oyigbo, Umuebule, Abonnema, Degema, Buguma, Mbiama, Ndoni, Isaka, Okrika, Ogu, and others, will not only attract tourists but also drive development to these regions. With their beautiful beaches and other tourist attractions, these areas have the potential to become popular destinations, creating jobs and boosting the local economy.
The Songhai farm has the potential to be revived, offering opportunities for tourists to appreciate the vast resources available in the state, just as it did in the past. Similarly, the waterfronts in Port Harcourt can be transformed into beautiful beaches for tourists to enjoy. With these in place, the social life in the city can be restored with exponential investments in tourism. Not only will tourists have a new attraction to visit, but residents will also benefit from improved living conditions.
This is why we urge increased government investments in tourism through a pragmatic diversification policy that is inclusive and innovative. We commend a vigorous private-public partnership that taps from the abundant tourism potential in the state to create an enabling environment for enduring peace and sustainsble development. We insist on a deliberate government strategy to boost investments in tourism and broaden citizen interactions to enhance healthy living and wellness in the state.

 

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Editorial

Fubara: Champion Of Service, Compassion

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The decision of the Rivers State Governor, Sir Siminalayi Fubara, to grant immediate promotions,
accompanied by full financial benefits to local government workers in the state serves as a significant milestone in his administration. The governor’s pronouncement is apt because local government workers provide services that enable the state to function optimally and ensure the well-being of its people at the grassroots.
The approval was granted during a private meeting held at the Government House in Port Harcourt last Monday. Principal officers representing all 23 local government areas, alongside the leadership of the Nigeria Union of Local Government Employees (NULGE), were present at the gathering.
Fubara also approved the immediate implementation of a N30,000.00 minimum wage for local government workers and the immediate implementation of the N35,000.00 wage award approved by the Federal Government to cushion the effects of the removal of fuel subsidy. He further acknowledged the importance of including NULGE as a member of the Local Government Pensions Board, as mandated by law.
This decision reflects his commitment to ensuring fair representation and the protection of the rights of local government workers. Furthermore, he emphasised the implementation of a consolidated salary structure for local government employees retiring at grade level 17.
The welfare of local government employees in Rivers State has been a topic of discussion and controversy for several years. The workers have consistently voiced their concerns, particularly through the media, regarding the lack of staff promotions for nearly eight years, and the failure to implement the approved N30,000 minimum wage, along with other benefits and entitlements since 2019. These issues have sparked protests and dissatisfaction among the staff.
Clearly, Fubara emerges as a towering figure, embodying unwavering commitment to Rivers people. With tireless efforts, he has not only touched but also transformed numerous lives at the grassroots. Fubara’s genuine concern for the well-being of his fellow citizens has been the driving force behind his remarkable achievements. His selfless actions have brought about positive change and uplifted communities.
The governor’s recent decision to approve the immediate payment of the N30,000 minimum wage for all local government staff in the state reflects his deep-rooted empathy and understanding of the challenges faced by the working class in the local government areas. This move demonstrates his commitment to improving the lives of the people he governs.
Also, his directive to pay N35,000 wage award to the workers to cushion the effects of the removal of fuel subsidy is commendable. It demonstrates his proactive approach in addressing the economic hardships faced by the workers. Moreover, his mandate for the prompt settlement of withheld allowances, gratuities, promotions, and accrued benefits validates a profound sense of justice and fairness.
In the light of the prolonged period of stagnation and uncertainty faced by the workers over the past eight years, the governor’s recent compassionate gesture exhibited profound necessity. It serves as a lifeline for these individuals who have grappled with an unbearable sense of insecurity and disarray within their professional lives.
Fubara’s actions transcend mere words, representing a resolute commitment to improving the welfare and preserving the dignity of each and every individual placed under his responsible guidance. The gravity of this gesture cannot be understated; it holds the potential to reinvigorate the spirits of those who have become disheartened by the persisting conditions of their employment.
Regrettably, the local government chairmen in the state seem uncertain about supporting this initiative, presumably for political reasons. Such a stance underscores the prevalence of politicking on issues where social welfare should remain paramount. Their legal challenge option, in this case, could result in unnecessary strains on our already burdened judicial system, prolong uncertainty for the workers, and essentially serve as another testament to the division and gridlock that retarded ongoing progress. Besides, the chairmen should know that the minimum wage is backed by law properly legislated upon by the National Assembly. In addition, the wage award is a Presidential Proclamation which also has the force of law as an Executive Order. Promotions, pension and gratuities are the rights of workers, which no law can deny them.
Therefore, instead, the chairmen should focus more on constructive dialogue and negotiation with the aim of arriving at a mutually beneficial resolution. The chairmen should find a common ground with the governor by acknowledging the far-reaching benefits of his proposition while actively voicing their concerns. Such an approach would promote a culture of collaborative governance. This is more likely to elicit public trust, affirming the role of the government as a protector and promoter of the people’s welfare.
Beyond its positive economic implications, this move also mirrors the administration’s moral responsibility towards its employees. It is necessary for the public sector to set an example as a fair and responsible employer by appreciating and rewarding staff members’ efforts adequately. Therefore, Fubara’s move helps to build trust between the government and its employees, promoting a more harmonious and respectful working environment, which is fundamental to productivity and employee satisfaction.
We express our admiration and unreserved appreciation for the governor, a paragon of exceptional leadership, humility, unwavering dedication to service, and an unyielding commitment to forging a bright and equitable future for all. His love for peace, respect for rule of law, fairness, equity and justice is unprecedented. Every facet of his character and endeavours exemplifies the epitome of excellence, inspiring others with his remarkable achievements and fostering a profound sense of unity and advancement. This is why we stand with Fubara on this move.

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