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Editorial

No To Total Ban On Motorcycles

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To combat the current nationwide insecurity in Nigeria, the Federal Government recently proposed
a ban on the operations of commercial motorcyclists, otherwise called “Okada” riders, across the country. This recommendation is another indication that deep or scientific thinking does not characterise how decisions are taken in the nation’s corridors of power. This is a problem any competent government can solve without throwing the baby away with the bath water.
The Federal Government, through the Attorney General of the Federation (AGF) and Minister of Justice, AbubakarMalami, had declared openly that the National Security Council, chaired by President MuhammaduBuhari, might be compelled to ban the use of motorcycles and mining activities after the discovery that it remained a major means of movement by bandits and source of amassing ransom from kidnap victims.
Painfully, these are people whom the government has dismally failed to provide with meaningful employment or any form of sustainable empowerment, even though many of them are well-educated with families and dependents. Besides the economic and security implications, the scheme, if enforced, will impoverish millions of Nigerians, and further compound the anti-social vices the authorities are striving hard to contain.
Commuters regard motorcycles as a great relief to their transportation difficulties while bike riders see their adventure as a source of livelihood. Undoubtedly, the use of motorcycles has enhanced mobility for the middle-class and other income earners, which by extension has contributed immensely to an increase in production through a boost in man-hours. Many commercial motorcycle riders are in the business because they have no options neither are they interested in the commission of crime.
Bikes offer certain advantages of easy maneuverability, ability to travel on bad roads, and responsiveness to demand. We cannot wish them away as a means of transportation. The government should be circumspect in their decision. States should undertake repairs of all damaged roads where “Okada” activities thrive because of the refusal of commercial vehicles to ply such routes. LGs should repair inner roads. Of the country’s total road network of 195,000 kilometres, only 35,000 are federal, leaving the rest to the states and LGs.
If all the people to be rendered jobless by this plan take to crime, how can the government cope? It is wrong to attribute all the movements of terrorists to motorcycles, as criminals also operate with vehicles. When terrorists attacked Kuje prison, was it the motorcycle riders that caused the failure of intelligence? How did they beat all the security checkpoints to get to such a fortified facility? Was it motorcycles that enabled them to overwhelm the security agents attached to the correctional centre? Were motorcycles also responsible for the late re-enforcement?
Although placing a ban on the use of motorbikes may cut the supply of logistics and source of funds for the purchase of arms to the terrorists, there must be well-thought-out alternatives to lessen the effects of the attendant loss of livelihoods on those to be affected. It must not worsen the country’s dire economic situation.
A World Bank report noted that the number of poor individuals in Nigeria will rise to 95.1 million in 2022. In 2020, the figure was 89.0 million people. Over 6.1 million more persons would have fallen into the poverty bracket between 2020 and 2022, a 6.7 per cent increase. With the projected 2022 figures, the number of poor people in Nigeria has had a four-year increase of 14.7 per cent from the 2018/19 figure of 82.1 million to the projected 95.1 million in 2022. The poverty rate has been aided by the impact of the COVID-19 crisis, the growing population, the high inflation rate, and the harsh effects of the Ukraine-Russia warfare.
This development is coming after the Nigerian government said it lifted 10.5 million citizens out of poverty between 2019 and 2021. The President has repeatedly said that the Bank of Industry has created nine million jobs in the country since 2015, and different schemes to generate jobs and tackle poverty have been launched; these have failed to stem poverty. Therefore, if the suggested ban is effected, many Nigerians will be directly impacted including their families.
Motorcycle ban may not be new to some states in the South-East and South-South where commercial bikes had been prohibited long ago. Moreover, Lagos State has restricted “Okada” in some local government areas. States like Kebbi, Sokoto, Borno, Yobe and Zamfara have placed a total ban on their activities while Katsina restricted their operations in some frontline local governments. Selective proscription of this transportation mode in troubled areas is the way to go, not a nationwide ban.
However, the Federal Government’s proposition is beyond its constitutional purview. In a federal polity, it is the states and local governments that should impose and carry out such a ban. The federal authorities can only enforce the ban in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), on federal interstate highways and in any state where an emergency rule is in force. At best, it can only persuade the states of the overriding urgency of such a sweeping embargo to combat insecurity.
A blanket prohibition must result in a provision for alternatives. Otherwise, the government will merely be expanding the army of criminals and terrorists. Handling the criminality of motorbike operators is a matter of competent governance. They can be trained, licensed and allocated areas of operations. They should be compelled to belong to unions that are accountable to the government so that felons among them can easily be nabbed.
In parts of the country where motorcycles have become the mode of transport for terrorists and other criminals, tricycles, bicycles and mini-buses can be used to replace them, at least for now. That will enable the easy isolation of terrorists on bikes. Also, the Federal Government should stem illegal immigration from the Sahel into Nigeria. This is because many of the insurgents are foreigners working with their Nigerian cohorts.
“Okada” riders should conduct themselves orderly with proper means of identification. Doing such will assist the security operatives in checkmating insecurity and fish out criminals using motorcycles to perpetrate evil. The security status of the country is unstable. It has to be realised that in overcoming the threat, the aftermath of every decision must be properly evaluated. The unemployment and insecurity haunting Nigeria will exacerbate if the government proceeds with its proposal.

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Editorial

Immortalising Herbert Wigwe

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Tears and emotions are running high as the countdown to the burial of the Wigwes draws nearer. Herbert Onyewumbu Wigwe, his wife, Chizoba, and their eldest son, Chizi, tragically lost their lives in a helicopter crash in the United States of America. Among the victims was the former Chairman of the Nigerian Exchange Group Plc, Abimbola Ogunbanjo. The families of the deceased have released a week-long burial programme for the late Wigwes, starting on March 4, and culminating in the burial on March 9.
Herbert Wigwe was born on August 15, 1966, in Ibadan and died at 58. He hailed from Isiokpo, Ikwerre Local Government Area of Rivers State. His father was the head of the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA), and his mother was a nurse. Herbert earned a bachelor’s degree in Accountancy from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, in 1987. He then pursued a Master’s degree in Banking and International Finance from the University College of North Wales, followed by a Master’s degree in Financial Economics from the University of London.
He began his career at Coopers & Lybrand Associates, where he developed chartered accountancy skills. He then worked at Guaranty Trust Bank Plc for over a decade, taking on various leadership roles. In 2002, he led the transformation of Access Bank Plc as its Deputy Managing Director. He became Group Managing Director/CEO in 2014, leading Access Bank to become one of Nigeria’s top five banking institutions. He also served as the Chairman of Access Bank Ghana Limited, Access Investment & Securities Limited, Central Securities and Clearing System (CSCS), and was the Chairman of Access Bank (UK) Limited until his passing.
In 2016, in recognition of his exemplary role in society and contributions to youth development, the Boys’ Brigade (BB) appointed Herbert as Patron for Lagos State Council. He was also named Banker of The Year in the same year by both The Sun and Vanguard newspapers.
Herbert Wigwe’s personal life was defined by his unwavering commitment to family, faith, and a wide range of interests. He was happily married to Chizoba Doreen Wigwe (nee Nwuba), a successful lawyer and entrepreneur. The couple was blessed with four children: Chizi, Tochi, Hannah, and David. Herbert’s devotion to his family was apparent in the precious moments he shared with them, cherishing every opportunity to be together.
A man of strong faith, he was known for his devout Christianity and active participation in the activities of Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG). As a pastor and mentor within his faith community, he impacted the lives of many with his wisdom and guidance. Herbert’s dedication to his beliefs was evident in the way he lived his life, always striving to be a positive example to those around him. He had unwavering commitment to his faith, and his influence within the church was profound.
His humanitarian efforts have had a significant impact through the non-profit organisation he established in 2016 — The HOW Foundation. As a result of his successful and selfless service to millions of underprivileged individuals in society, he was honoured with the Nigerian national award of Commander of the Order of the Niger (CON) by former President Muhammadu Buhari in October 2022.
The pride of Ikwerreland, and indeed, Rivers State, lies in the upcoming world-class Wigwe University located at Isiokpo, the headquarters of Ikwerre Local Government Area. Herbert had invested half a billion dollars in the institution, focusing on management, science and engineering, Information Technology (IT) and creative arts. The institution is due for commissioning in September 2024, bringing a new era of higher education to the region.
The passing of Dr Herbert Wigwe has left a deep void in the hearts of many, with tributes pouring in from all over the world. President Bola Tinubu expressed his shock and sorrow at the “overwhelming tragedy of Dr Wigwe’s death”. Governors also paid their respects, highlighting his industry, spirit of excellence, and status as a business icon of repute.
During the Night of Tributes in Port Harcourt, the Rivers State Governor, Sir Siminalayi Fubara, acknowledged Herbert’s impactful life and positive influence on society. Fubara expressed his administration’s determination to immortalise him as a worthy son of the state. He described his passing as a double loss, both as an in-law and as a trailblasing individual who embodied the resilience and ambition of Rivers people.
The Senate paid tributes to the late Herbert Wigwe, expressing sorrow over his passing and acknowledging the immense loss to Nigeria, Africa, and the world. A former governor and classmate of Wigwe at Federal Government College in Sokoto, Senator Aminu Tambuwal, shared his memories of his generosity in providing 10 Hajj seats to his people even though he was a Christian. Senate President Godswill Akpabio praised the late finance expert as a true pan-Africanist who successfully expanded Access Bank’s global reach.
The outpouring of grief and messages within the country and across the world testify to Herbert’s extraordinary qualities and outstanding contributions. He was an exceptional person who never let his remarkable achievements diminish his compassion for others. While some people lose touch with their roots after reaching the pinnacle of success, he remained connected to people from all walks of life. He maintained relationships with his high-profile acquaintances, as well as with his secondary school classmates, church members, village chiefs, community leaders, and former colleagues.
From one end of the spectrum to the other, Herbert consistently embodied his witty, kind, humorous, and amiable self. He had a deep passion for youths and initiated numerous mentorship programmes for them. His philanthropic efforts through his foundation are widely recognised. The establishment of a university for what he called the ‘fearless’ generation will always be a lasting legacy. We are thrilled that the individuals he brought together to bring the university to life have pledged to continue his dream.
Undeniably, the late Herbert Wigwe deeply connects with our shared social awareness. Therefore, in line with Governor Fubara’s stance, we strongly believe that the esteemed banker should be commemorated for his remarkable and exceptional character. This will serve to educate present and future generations on the values of hard work, innovation, and perseverance. By immortalising him, we can inspire people to strive for greatness and contribute to the creation of a society that is as commendable as those we choose to celebrate.
May God grant their souls: Dr Herbert Wigwe, his lovely wife, Chizoba Doreen, and son, Chizi, eternal rest!

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Editorial

Towards Cutting Cost Of Governance

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After many years in limbo, the Federal Executive Council (FEC) has given approval to the 2012 Steve Oronsaye Committee Report, which suggests merging, scrapping or subsuming certain ministries, departments, agencies (MDAs) and commissions of the government with similar functions. The approval was given at the FEC meeting on Monday, February 26. This decision is aimed at reducing the cost of governance and improving efficiency within the government.
The administration of former President Goodluck Jonathan, which established the committee in 2011, did not follow through with the recommendations. Instead, it issued a White Paper to show executive acceptance. Similarly, former President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration released a White Paper on the report and made efforts to put it into action. However, it later reversed course after taking a few initial steps, leading to the consolidation of few government agencies.
Recall that the Oronsaye committee submitted a report consisting of 800 pages on April 16, 2012. The report on public sector reforms revealed that there are 541 Federal Government parastatals, commissions, and agencies and suggested that 102 agencies and parastatals should be abolished or merged, while others were suggested to be self-funding. The committee identified a significant amount of competition among multiple overlapping agencies. This competition not only caused resentment among government agencies but also led to unnecessary wastage of funds.
Also recommended by the committee, among other things, was the stoppage of government funding for professional bodies and councils. The main aim of these measures was to prudently allocate funds for essential infrastructure projects all over the country. Oronsaye’s report received a mixed response as job cuts were expected. But, many people believed that despite the impact on agencies and individuals, the civil service would become stronger and more efficient.
A statement signed by the Special Adviser on Information and Strategy to President Tinubu, Bayo Onanuga, in Abuja, provided the details of the resolutions reached during the FEC meeting. According to Onanuga, an eight-man committee had a 12-week deadline to ensure that the necessary legislative amendments and administrative restructuring needed to implement the reforms were effected efficiently.
Among the principal suggestions are the inclusion of the National Salaries, Income and Wages Commission under the Fiscal Commission and Revenue Mobilisation departments. The Bureau of Public Enterprise will merge with the Infrastructure Concession and Regulatory Commission, renaming it the Public Enterprises and Infrastructural Concession Commission. Public Complaints Commission and National Human Rights Commission will merge.
The report proposes the restructuring of several agencies, including the scrapping of the Pension Transitional Arrangement Directorate (PTAD), merging the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) and National Commission for Refugees into the National Emergency and Refugee Management Commission, and renaming the Border Communities Development Agency as a department under the National Boundary Commission. The report also consolidates the Code of Conduct Bureau, Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, and Independent Corrupt Practices and Related Offences Commission as National Anti-Corruption Commission.
The Federal Ministry of Science will oversee a new agency combining NCAM, NASENI, and PRODA, while the National Commission for Museums and Monuments and Gallery of Arts will merge into a single entity. The National Theatre will become one with National Troupe, and the Directorate of Technical Cooperation in Africa and Directorate of Technical Aid Corp will unite under the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, among others.
We applaud the Tinubu administration for taking bold steps to address high governance costs by incorporating recommendations from the Orosanye report. In a time when many Nigerians are facing challenges and the economy is showing signs of weakness, reducing the expenses associated with governance will help redirect resources to areas of greater need and stimulate economic growth.
It is truly heartwarming to see that after many years of hesitation and a lack of political will to take the necessary actions to achieve the desired results, especially following the release of the Jonathan and Buhari White Papers on the report, the Federal Government has finally recognised the importance of fully implementing the recommendations of the Oronsaye report on civil service reform.
This report should be implemented without further delay, as many MDAs are not only draining the economy but were established for political purposes. The funds saved from the consolidation and elimination of these agencies could be better utilised to establish industries and create employment opportunities across the country. The industries should be self-sustaining, reducing the need for annual budgetary allocations.
There is a fear that implementing the report could lead to mass layoffs of workers. But the Federal Government has assured Nigerians that genuine employees of the affected MDAs would be redeployed to appropriate offices without any job losses. We hope that the Federal Government will see this task through. While the assignment may seem challenging, it is definitely achievable with determination. This is an area the Tinubu government can make a positive impact. And if religiously implemented, it obviously will help cut down the cost of governance to save scarce resources and funds for areas of critical need. This is the right way to go!

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Editorial

Towards Sustainable Tourism In Nigeria 

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In a resolution passed on February 6, 2023, the UN General Assembly declared February 17, to be Global Tour-
ism Resilience Day. The resolution emphasised the importance of encouraging sustainable tourism development. The disruptive and critical effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the travel and tourism sector informed this decision. Additionally, it drew upon precedent UN resolutions, conferences, and agendas highlighting environmental sustainability and bolstering industry resilience.
Tourism is a vital industry that contributes to sustainable development and the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in developing countries. It provides income, foreign currency earnings, tax revenue, and employment, and connects people with nature, promoting environmental responsibility and conservation. This cross-cutting industry is particularly beneficial for Africa and middle-income countries.
Sustainable tourism, including ecotourism, promotes economic growth, poverty alleviation, employment, and decent work. It accelerates lasting consumption, promotes sustainable use of oceans and marine resources, and enhances local culture. It improves the quality of life for women, young people, indigenous communities, and rural populations, ultimately contributing to the achievement of the SDGs.
Utilising endurable and resilient tourism as a means to promote continuous and inclusive economic growth, social development, and financial inclusion facilitates the formalisation of the informal sector. It also supports domestic resource mobilisation, environmental protection, the elimination of poverty and hunger, as well as the conservation and tenable utilisation of biodiversity and natural resources. Moreover, sustainable tourism encourages investment and entrepreneurship in the industry.
Tourism plays a vital role in supporting numerous direct and indirect employment opportunities globally, especially benefiting women and young individuals. In certain small island nations and developing economies, tourism makes up more than 20 per cent of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The economic impact of tourism, indicated by the tourism direct GDP, was calculated at $1.9trillion in 2021, surpassing the $1.6trillion reported in 2020. However, it still remains lower than the pre-pandemic figure of $3.5trillion.
Tourism is a rapidly growing global economic sector, and destination countries must develop it sustainably to maximise benefits. Nigeria, with its vast geography, cultural diversity, and historical sites, has established tourism ministries to capitalise on its potential. The country’s landscape holds great potential for a sector that can compete with black gold in terms of foreign exchange earnings, making it an attractive destination for tourists.
However, owing to the considerable financial gains obtained from the oil industry, tourism, along with other sectors of our economy such as agriculture and solid minerals, has been severely overlooked. For instance, the annual Osun Osogbo Festival and the Calabar Carnival have been sustained; thanks to the dedicated initiatives of private sector contributors. These events have propelled the city of Calabar into international recognition in recent years.
The previously lively Argungu Fishing Festival, the renowned Argungu Motor Rally, the Yankari Game Reserve, the Jos Wildlife Park, the Olumo Rock, the Asop Falls, and the boat regatta in the coastal regions of Nigeria, particularly Opobo and Andoni, have all seen a decline.
In contrast, the Elmina Slave Castle in Ghana remains a popular destination for tourists seeking to learn about the tragic history of trans-Atlantic slave trade victims. Monuments in Nigeria such as those in Calabar, Lagos, and Badagry are gradually losing their significance in the global tourism landscape.
The Mambilla Plateau, Gashaka-Gumti Game Reserve, Ngel-Nyaki Forest Reserve, and Taraba’s indigenous festivals are potential tourism destinations that could generate revenue comparable to Nigeria’s oil sector earnings. Proper promotion of these attractions could boost the states’ economies and improve their status as one of the poorest in Nigeria. Yobe and Borno states also have the Dagona Birds Sanctuary, attracting diverse bird species from Europe, North America, Australia, and Asia.
Several key landmarks showcase Nigeria’s rich history and potential, such as the 8,000-year-old Dafuna Canoe, the Tulo-Tulowa – dubbed the ‘Desert Land of Hope,’ – as well as the shrinking Lake Chad, which could have thrived as a critical tourist and economic centre. More could have been done by the government to preserve and support these treasures.
The pertinent government bodies must safeguard our biodiversity by penalising those who partake in haphazard bush burning and deforestation. The government should increase funding for infrastructure development and showcase Nigerian tourism attractions globally on international media platforms and embassies. There should be private sector involvement. The authorities should also intensify efforts to tackle security challenges in areas that could negatively impact the sector, such as terrorism, armed banditry, kidnapping, and other allied crimes. Tourists would not visit a country suffering acute security challenges, despite the attractiveness of its tourism destinations.
To address spending deficits and inflation, diversifying the economy is crucial. Tourism, with its substantial revenue sources, can fund government policies and programmes. States like Rivers can use tourism to stimulate economic growth, create new jobs, and foster community connections. This initiative will boost revenue, fuel developmental efforts, strengthen social bonds, and promote peace and cultural unity.
Exploring new investment opportunities in tourism in areas like Port Harcourt, Bonny, Andoni, Opobo, Kono, Okomoko, Oyigbo, Umuebule, Abonnema, Degema, Buguma, Mbiama, Ndoni, Isaka, Okrika, Ogu, and others, will not only attract tourists but also drive development to these regions. With their beautiful beaches and other tourist attractions, these areas have the potential to become popular destinations, creating jobs and boosting the local economy.
The Songhai farm has the potential to be revived, offering opportunities for tourists to appreciate the vast resources available in the state, just as it did in the past. Similarly, the waterfronts in Port Harcourt can be transformed into beautiful beaches for tourists to enjoy. With these in place, the social life in the city can be restored with exponential investments in tourism. Not only will tourists have a new attraction to visit, but residents will also benefit from improved living conditions.
This is why we urge increased government investments in tourism through a pragmatic diversification policy that is inclusive and innovative. We commend a vigorous private-public partnership that taps from the abundant tourism potential in the state to create an enabling environment for enduring peace and sustainsble development. We insist on a deliberate government strategy to boost investments in tourism and broaden citizen interactions to enhance healthy living and wellness in the state.

 

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