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No More Reluctant President …Let The Real Search Begin Now

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26041003Three things worry me in  campaigns leading to virtually every  Election in Nigeria: Claim to divine call for service; ‘my people want me’ and truly reluctant candidates.

In the elections of 2007 which ushered the Umaru Musa Yar’Adua Presidency, no fewer than five aspirants apart from Pastor Chris Okotie hinged their ambition on call from God, ostensibly to help bail out the once respected Giant of Africa from its many woes, especially, the shackles of democratic ineptitude. None of those eventually got elected and should have learnt a lesson or two from their failed attempt to achieve personal needs using divine blackmail.

Another is the annoying refrain from among visibly ambitious politicians,  very often heard claiming, ‘my people want me’, a boring deception that is as ineffective as it is insulting.

The third, the true subject of this treatise, like the group just addressed are often brewed under same cover and later unleashed on a gullible citizenry by a small collection of political tin-gods, who, knowing their unlikehood of ever being accepted by Nigerians, search for willing puns that are often as unprepared as they are confused for the most part of their hold unto power. These are the reluctant candidates.

Sadly, being products of such illicit political  brew, such candidates often spend most part of their tenure taking orders, calls for favours, directives on who to enlist or who not to enlist into the government of the day, rather than serve Nigeria and Nigerians who were deceived sorry persuaded into electing them.

But considering the myriad of challenges Nigeria faces today: mission to redeem our battered international image; amend squinting portions of the 1990 constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria; the Niger Delta question; increasing security challenges; grueling energy concerns;  a predominantly monolithic economy, dependent largely on oil and gas; decaying infrastructure;  threat of a single party system; an undependable police force; a self-serving political class; lingering ethno-religious intolerance; pressing need for truly fiscal federalism; lack of fiscal disciple; a laughable democratic culture; a less productive education system that is strictly paper-based, no matter how worthless and not on appropriate skills; a systemic isolation of minorities from the commonwealth of the federation and above all else, the paucity of truly, nationalistic leaders, Nigeria can no ill- afford reluctant, unprepared,  imposed and above all else less patriotic men and women without the requisite self worth integrity, drive, charisma and leadership. Some may have all these fine qualities and even more but  reluctant.

In years leading to the 1979 national elections, a former school teacher and ardent Islamic scholar, Alhaji Shehu Shagari’s biggest ambition was to become a senator of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. Those that Nigerians saw as truly prepared for the presidential job included respectable humanist and unrepentant progressive, Mallam Aminu Kano, father of Western political development, Chief Obafemi Awolowo and of course the brilliant nationalist cum technocrat Dr. Nnamdi Azikiwe.

But because Nigeria was at such a stage where only an unpopular but influential few were blessed with the support of many beggers, trees and rams, the argument that majority is not always right made the most meaning. For, among the willing and ready,  it was a reluctant Alhaji Shehu Shagari that Nigerians eventually saw as the president, while, infact the unofficial chief executive was an Umaru Dikko, undoubtedly, the arrow-head of the cabal that foisted the school teacher on the nation.

Expectedly, by 1983, when the cabal pushed further that the president sought re-election and was gruelled by news hounds on his achievements, during the first tenure, a reluctant president simply replied, ‘peace and unity’. Not that  he was the Head of State after a civil war that threatened the peace and unity of Nigeria but a president at peace time and of a nation already one united by the post-war slogan Go-On-With-One-Nigeria, (GOWON).

But because Shagari merely wanted to be a senator and not president and Commander-In-Chief of the Nigerian armed forces, he sat by and watched his ‘makers’ hold Nigeria hostage, while, education took a down-turn, infrastructure in horrible state, corruption at appalling speed; civil discontent so high, an economy in shambles and faith in Nigeria at its lowest ebb.

Little wonder, in December 1983, just months after his re-election, when, a troubled army toppled his rogue-administration, Nigerians celebrated the demise of a tenure that exhibited all the attributes of unpreparedness and reluctance.

Again, just out of prison Chief Olusegun Obasanjo, by all standards bore the semblances  of another Northern creation without any home support. He himself apparently realized that  most part of his first tenure of four year, 1999 to 2003 was a product of reluctance on his part and imposition by others, decided to count his real presidential years from 2003 to 2007. That may also have been, in my assessment, reason for his push for tenure extension.

With that attempt foiled, when it was Obasanjo’s time to choose a successor in 2007, when it  really became clear that a third, (in His opinion, the second tenure) bid had collapsed, Obasanjo sought it through yet another unwilling duo of Alhaji Umaru Musa Yar’Adua and Dr Goodluck Jonathan. After undergoing a kidney transplant earlier, the most, then Kastina State governor Yar’Adua needed was to serve out his single tenure and face his health concerns, while Jonathan’s main ambition was to get elected as executive governor of Bayelsa State, having assumed acting capacity following the ouster of Chief Diepriye Alamieyesigha, for doing in that state less than 20 per cent of the horrible things Umaru Dikko did in Nigeria and to Nigerians, before his escape from the shores of the country in 1983.

Unfortunately for Obasanjo, the once reluctant candidate found in the young governors new friends and submitted to pressures to clip his maker’s wings by amending the most important parts of the PDP constitution that should have allowed the Ogun High Chief, life chairmanship of the Board of Trustees of the ruling party. The rest about Yar’Adua does not require  any more repeat.

Now, with just months to the next presidential elections, there are ominous signs that Nigeria may yet settle for another reluctant president, unless all serious minded persons, with the presidency in mind put themselves forward for a more systemic, thorough and holistic appraisal by the citizenry, before arriving at a just end.

Why, for instance cannot Acting President Goodluck Jonathan say for sure if he’d like to run or not? Why cannot other political parties put forward their arrow-heads now and start telling Nigerians what different measures they would take to addressing Nigeria’s mounting pronlems? What is holding back the Atikus’, the Buhari’s the Okoties, the Odili’s and even the Marwa’s from emerging with different messages?

It is true that the Yar’Adua/Jonathan tenure suffered a serious set-back actuated by the president’s protracted ill-health and thus requires of the Acting President enormous time, energy and focus to put things right, otherwise in advanced democracies, the times like we are in, of months, leading to the next election season are usually regarded as lame-dock period when serving presidents think more about reelection or help in their party’s campaign efforts. Although I am tempted to agree that it may be difficult for Jonathan to allow himself to be distracted at this moment by election  concerns especially,  in view of the wasted months and  because of the many responsibilities, he is today relied upon to shoulder, I  still don’t believe that all that the Yar’Adua/Jonathan ticket promised and could not achieve  in four years can be achieved in just months.

That being so, and granted the constitutional right he enjoys as a Nigerian, not just a PDP stalwart, methinks Jonathan should break away from the ranks of Nigerian leaders who choose to emerge at the last minutes and blame a long nurtured ambition on pressures from others.

My Agony is that doing so now  could also be playing into the hands of a viscious cabal to prey on, using parliamentary instability, polarization of the ruling party, as is being experienced today, and playing the questionable majority card as tools, but early projection is what the Nigerian electorate deserves, because it will enable them properly prepare for what and who they want.

If Jonathan wants to govern Nigeria as substantive president and wishes to contest the next elections, he should tell Nigerians in a timely fashion and so should all others so we don’t end up having yet another reluctant presidential candidate or a middle course, whether relatively unprepared or on not after a vigorous debate. Deciding now, could reduce the numbers of the ambitious lot who can only be checked by big names like Jonathan’s.

Nigeria’s many problems require a little more serious candidates than the familiar reluctant choices. Hate him or love him, that is why I salute Ibrahim Badamosi Babangida’s shocking re-emergence in the political arena, no matter how unwelcome some may see it and  the ghost of  June 12 notwithstanding.

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$130m Fraud: Rivers Sues Saipem SPA, Saipem Contracting Firm, Others

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The Rivers State Government has charged two construction firms, Saipem SPA and Saipem Contracting Nigeria Ltd, to court over an alleged conspiracy to cheat and with intent to defraud the state of the sum of $130million, being advanced payment for the construction of the OCGT power plant in Port Harcourt.
In a 16-count criminal charge filed by the Director of Public Prosecution, C.F. Amadi for the Rivers State Attorney General, the state alleged that after collecting the said sum as advanced payment between 2011 and 2018, the defendants have not kept their obligation under the contract.
Others charged alongside the companies were Walter Peviana; Kelechi Sinteh Chinakwe; Giandomenico Zingali; Vitto Testaguzza and Davide Anelli, who are directors and officers of the companies.
The defendants are charged with various offences ranging from conspiracy, cheating and obtaining credit by false pretence, contrary to Section 518 (6) and (7) and punishable under Section 518 of the Criminal Code, Cap 37 Vol. 2 Laws of Rivers State of Nigeria, 1999, section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b) of the Criminal Code, Cap 37 Vol. 2 Laws of Rivers State, amongst others.
Already, the Rivers State Government has issued a fiat to the law firm of Godwin Obla (SAN) to prosecute the matter before the state High court.
The defendants are equally charged for the offence of false Statements by Officials of Companies contrary to and punishable under Section 436 (b).
The prosecution specifically accused the defendants of obtaining credit of $130million by false pretences or other fraud contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b); obtaining credit of $20,467,942.00 by false pretences or other fraud contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b), obtaining credit of N7,000,000,000.00 only by false pretences or other fraud contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b).
They are charged for obtaining credit of N318,640,173.54, by false pretences or other fraud contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b); attempt to cheat $97million contrary to Section 508 and punishable under Section 509; attempt to cheat $15million contrary to Section 508 and punishable under Section 509; conspiracy to receive a credit of $97million by false pretences contrary to Section 518 (6) and punishable under Section 518; cheating $11million contrary to Section 421 and punishable under Section 421; cheating contrary to Section 421 and punishable under Section 421; cheating N110, 097, 416.51 contrary to Section 421 and punishable under Section 421; cheating by collecting sums attributable to shared facilities already paid for in AFAM Phase I in AFAM Phase II contrary to Section 421 and punishable under Section 421.
Obtaining N20, 467, 942 contrary to Section 421 and punishable under Section 421; obtaining credit of $60,168,936.00 by false pretences or other fraud, contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b); obtaining credit of $1,512,034.00 by false pretences or other fraud contrary to Section 419A and punishable under Section 419 (A) (1) (b) all of the Criminal Code Law of Rivers State, Cap 37 Vol. 2 Laws of Rivers State of Nigeria 1999.
According to the Proof of Evidence attached to the charge and the statement made by the Head, Power Generation/Mechanical of the Rivers State Ministry of Power, one Mr Temple Azunda M., the facts constituting the case in hand are as follows:
Saipem SPA and Saipem Contracting Nigeria Limited and other officers of the duo, herein the Defendants, are Italian companies which services have been retained by the Rivers State Government, herein RSG, in several projects, prominent amongst which is the AFAM Phase II Power Plant Project.
By an initial tripartite agreement made on the January 20, 2010, the RSG under the auspices of the Rivers State Ministry of Power entered a contract with Saipem Contracting Nigeria Limited, Saipem SPA for the construction of the OGCT power plant in Port Harcourt at a total cost of $119million consequent upon which the Rivers State Government made advance payments, in instalments, to Saipem Contracting Nigeria Ltd and Saipem SPA amounting in total to a sum of $130million in all which the Defendants have acknowledged receipt of.
The Defendants were to be given an initial mobilization of 20per cent of the total contract sum which the RSG paid.
It was part of the initial agreement – and indeed a condition sine qua non – that, to access the 2nd tranche of payment of 25per cent from the Rivers State Government, the Defendants would mandatorily have installed the Gas Turbine into the foundations as referenced in ATTACHMENT 1 to VO 007 which states that:
CONTRACTOR shall be entitled to a payment corresponding to 20per cent of the VO No. 007 LS PRICE upon mobilisation to site and commencement of bush clearing activities at SITE.
Upon commencement of bush clearing activities at the site, the contractor shall issue the invoice relevant to the above payment and the owner shall pay such invoice within 14 days from its issuance.
The parties agree that no deduction for recovery of advance payment shall apply on the payment due to the contractor for invoices issued by the contractor in accordance with this paragraph.

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Disregard Sentiment On More Law School Campuses, Wike Urges

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Rivers State Governor, Chief Nyesom Wike has said approval for any new campus of the Nigerian Law School in the country should be based on needs assessment and not on political sentiment.
He noted that with the paucity of funds being allocated to the Nigerian Law School by the Federal Government, states with capacity to build brand new campuses of the institution should be encouraged to do so based on the model provided by the Council of Legal Education.
Wike stated this when members of the Senate Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights and Legal Matters led by its Chairman, Senator Michael Opeyemi Bamidele, paid him a courtesy call at the Government House, Port Harcourt, yesterday.
This is as members of the Senate Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights and Legal Matters have endorsed the Dr. Nabo Graham-Douglas Campus of the Nigerian Law School in Port Harcourt, and declared that it has come to stay.
The Rivers State governor observed that due to the current insufficient carrying capacity of the Nigerian Law School, there has been clamour for proliferation of more campuses across the country.
He, however, cautioned that this must not be done on the basis of political sentiment.
“Most of us attended the Nigerian Law School, Lagos, and even at that time, it was not easy to have accommodation within the school. But, at least, we were able to attend classes. So, it is reasonable for everybody to say there is need to increase the carrying capacity. But that must be done with objectivity; that must be done with facts that must not be done by sentiment.”
He explained that two years ago when he attended the call to bar ceremony at the Abuja campus of the Nigerian Law School, he was appalled by the decrepit infrastructure in the school.
According to him, this was what spurred the Rivers State Government to build 900 bed space hostels and 1,500 capacity auditorium for students in Yenagoa campus, and then, the subsequent construction of a brand new campus in Port Harcourt.
“From the record I’ve checked, they’ve (Nigerian Law School) never gotten more than N61million to fund the law school yearly. And I made a special appeal to support to Council of Legal Education to rehabilitate the campus in Abuja, and the Director General said no, we have more problem in Yenagoa, leave Abuja.
“You’ll never allow your slave to attend the campus in Yenagoa. And I want to thank the DG for being a true Nigerian. As I speak to you today, Rivers State Government is investing not less than N5.1billion in Yenagoa campus. What is our interest? Our interest is to contribute to the development of legal education in Nigeria.”
Wike said based on the Federal Government’s inability to sufficiently fund the Nigerian Law School, any state government that desires to have a campus should approach the Council of Legal Education for approval.
“I will appeal, in solving this carrying capacity problem, let’s not also create other problems. It is a professional school and so we must be guided. If any state wants to have a law school there must be a model.”
The governor explained that the construction of Nabo Graham-Douglas Campus of the Nigerian Law School in Port Harcourt will cost the Rivers State government N16billion.
According to him, every thing that is supposed to be in a law school would be found in the Port Harcourt campus when it is completed early next year.
“We are not just merely building a law school; we have acquired investment to handover to the law school to use to sustain the school here. This is a model that a law school should be.”
The governor also disclosed once the project is completed and handed over to the Council of Legal Education, the state government would also provide subvention to the council to run the campus for the next four years.
In his remarks, Chairman, Senate Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights and Legal Matters, Senator Michael Opeyemi Bamidele, said they were in the state to assess the progress of work at the Port Harcourt Campus of the Nigerian Law School.
“Your Excellency, when we were all privileged to study law in this country and just as we are doing graduation, the Nigerian Law School was waiting to absorb us. We have children in this country who graduated some two, three, four years ago and they are still waiting to be absorbed into the Nigerian Law School.
“Was it based on the refusal by the Nigerian Law School to so admit them, no. But based simply on the fact that the Nigerian Law School, as presently constituted and as funded, is lacking the capacity to be able to respond to the corresponding needs of the Nigerian public, given the number of universities that turned out law graduates every year.”
He commended the governor for his intervention to build a befitting campus of the Nigerian Law School in Rivers State.
However, members of the Nigerian Senate Committee on Judiciary, Human Rights and Legal Matters have endorsed the Dr. Nabo Graham-Douglas Campus of the Nigerian Law School in Port Harcourt and declared that it has come to stay.
The committee members gave the endorsement shortly after inspecting ongoing civil construction work at the campus as part of their oversight function in Port Harcourt, yesterday.
They were conducted round the project sites by the Rivers State Governor, Chief Nyesom Wike, first to the staff quarters beside the Hotel Presidential and then to the law school campus at Rumueme, Port Harcourt.
Chairman of the committee, Senator Michael Opeyemi Bamidele said they were, no doubt, impressed with what they have seen in Port Harcourt.
According to him, their colleagues in the Senate, including the leadership of the Senate who have invested so much trust and put them in charge of the committee were waiting to hear from them.
But, he emphasised, that what they have seen was consistent with global best practice standard when it comes to providing legal education.
“And we are really excited about this for the future of the legal profession which is our own primary constituency, because ours is a committee where virtually, all members are lawyers and members of this profession.
“It was important for us to come here because we are not going to just write any report and take any decision based on sentiment. I mean, this is a nonpartisan legislative action.”
Bamidele noted that Rivers State is boldly setting a standard for legal education in the country and it does appear to be a high one.
“After inspecting the ongoing works, the governor also took us to inspect existing property that have been acquired for the purpose of surrendering these same property to the law school to use as a source of revenue. That’s why I’m saying there’s a Rivers standard.
“And of course, when you now come to the quality of what is on ground, more than any of the law schools that have existed before the creation of this, we have seen quality here that will distinctly place this on the world map when you’re talking about law school campuses that can stand the test of time.”
Bamidele explained that having come to determine what actually is on ground and also to see the quality of work, they are fascinated to see about 750 workers on the construction site.
According to him, that is something that gladdens their hearts because at a time like this, the Rivers State Government was able to provide such number of jobs to its people.
“There is a need for us to engage in activities that will create employment opportunities for our people. We have seen a lot of artisans here at work, contractors are here at work.
“A lot of building materials are being brought to this site and the economic implication of these are far reaching for Rivers State and on the long run for the Federal Republic of Nigeria.
“We do not take that for granted. Beyond the employment opportunities that this is creating temporarily, we also know that an additional campus of the Nigerian Law School taking off in Port Harcourt would also mean a long term career job opportunities for people who will also work here as administrative staff.
“The number of lecturers that will increase, as career people. We feel that’s another reason why this deserve to be celebrated.”
Bamidele said except the Lagos campus of the Nigerian Law School that was created by an operation of law in 1962, the other five campuses were created by administrative action like the campus in Port Harcourt because it was approved by the President of the country.

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RSG, Not FIRS, Entitled To Collect VAT, Related Taxes In Rivers -Court

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The Federal High Court sitting in Port Harcourt has declared that it is the Rivers State Government, not the Federal Inland Revenue Services (FIRS), should collect Valued Added Tax (VAT) and Personal Income Tax (PIT) in the state.
The court, presided over by Justice Stephen Dalyop Pam, also issued an order of perpetual injunction restraining the Federal Inland Revenue Service and the Attorney General of the Federation, both first and second defendants in the suit, from collecting, demanding, threatening and intimidating residents of Rivers State to pay to FIRS, PIT and VAT.
Pam made the assertion while delivering judgement in Suit No. FHC/PH/CS/149/2020, filed by the Attorney General for Rivers State (plaintiff), against the Federal Inland Revenue Service (first defendant) and the Attorney General of the Federation (second defendant).
The court, which granted all the 11 reliefs sought by the Rivers State Government, stated that there was no constitutional basis for the FIRS to demand for and collect VAT, Withholding Tax (WHT), Education Tax and Technology Levy in Rivers State or any other state of the federation, being that the constitutional powers and competence of the Federal Government was limited to taxation of incomes, profits and capital gains, which do not include VAT or any other species of sales, or levy other than those specifically mentioned in Items 58 and 59 of the Exclusive Legislative List of the Constitution.
The judge dismissed the preliminary objections filed by the defendants that the court lacks jurisdiction to hear the suit and that the case should be transferred to Court of Appeal for interpretation.
Pam, who also dismissed objection raised by the defendants that the National Assembly ought to have been made a party in the suit, declared that the issues of taxes raised by the state government were issues of law that the court was constitutionally empowered to entertain.
He declared that after a diligent review of the issues raised by bothplaintiff and the defendants, the plaintiff had proven beyond doubt that it was entitled to all the 11 reliefs sought in the suit.
The court agreed with the Rivers State Government that it was the state and not FIRS that was constitutionally entitled to impose taxes enforceable or collectable in its territory of the nature of consumption or sales tax, VAT, education and other taxes or levies, other than the taxes and duties specifically reserved for the Federal Government by Items 58 and 59 of Part 1 of the Second Schedule of the 1999 Constitution as amended.
Also, the court declared that the defendants were not constitutionally entitled to charge or impose levies, charges or rates (under any guise or by whatever name called) on the residents of Rivers State, and indeed, any state of the federation.
Among the reliefs sought by the Rivers State Government, was a declaration that the constitutional power of the Federal Government to impose taxes and duties was only limited to the items listed in Items 58 and 59 of Part 1 of the Second Schedule of the 1999 Constitution as amended.
The Rivers State Government had also urged the court to declare that, by virtue of the provisions of Items 7 and 8 of the Part II (Concurrent Legislative List) of the Second Schedule of the Constitution, the power of the Federal Government to delegate the collection of taxes can only be exercised by the state government or other authority of the state, and no other person.
The state government had further asked the court to declare that all statutory provisions made or purportedly made in the exercise of the legislative powers of the Federal Government, which contains provisions which are inconsistent with or in excess of the powers to impose tax and duties, as prescribed by Items 58 and 59 of the Part I of the Second Schedule of the 1999 Constitution, or inconsistent with the power to delegate the duty of collection of taxes, as contained in Items 7 and 8 of Part II of the Second Schedule of the Constitution, were unconstitutional, null and void.
Lead counsel for the Rivers State Government, Donald Chika Denwigwe (SAN), who spoke to journalists after the court session, explained that the case was all about the interpretation of the Constitution as regards the authority of the government at the state and federal levels to collect certain revenues, particularly, VAT.
“So, during the determination of the matter, some issues of law were thrown up like, whether or not the case should be referred to the Court of Appeal for the determination of some issues.
“The court noted that the application is like asking the Federal High Court to transfer the entire case to the Court of Appeal. In which case, if the court so decides, there will be nothing left to refer back to the Federal High Court as required by the Constitution.”
According to Denwigwe, the court refused that prayer, and decided that the case was in its proper place before the Federal High Court, and was, therefore, competent to determine it.
Speaking on the implications of the judgement, Denwigwe said it was now, unlawful for such taxes as VAT in Rivers State to be collected by any agency of the Federal Government.
“In a summary, it is a determination that it is wrong for the Federal Government to be collecting taxes which are constitutionally reserved for the state governments to collect. The implication of the judgement is that the government (federal and state) as an authority under the constitution,should be advised by the judgement that it is the duty of all government authorities to comply with and obey the law so long as the court has interpreted it and said what that law is.
“So, in other words, the issue of Value Added Tax (VAT) in the territory of Rivers State and Personal Income Tax should be reserved for the government of Rivers State.”
Counsel to FIRS, O.C. Eyibo said he will study the judgment and advise his client.

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