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Communal Crisis: Enugu Govt Suspends Two Traditional Rulers

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The Enugu State Government, yesterday, suspended the traditional rulers of Akwuke and Akwuke Uwani autonomous communities, in Enugu South Local Government Area, HRH Igwe Bernard Nwoye and HRH Igwe Cyprian Ekwomchi, respectively.
This is over allegations of misconduct leading to a mass protest to the Government House, Enugu, by indigenes of the two communities.
The suspension, which is for 30 days, in the first instance, according to a statement by the Secretary to the State Government, Prof. Simon Uchenna Ortuanya, was in the interest of peace, order and good governance and in compliance with Section 10 (b) of the Traditional Rulers Law, Cap 151 Revised Laws of Enugu State, 2004.
The statement further added that the State Commissioner for Chieftaincy Matters, Dr. Charles Egumgbe, pursuant to Section 16 (1) of the Traditional Rulers Law “has initiated an Administrative Enquiry” in respect of the allegations against the affected traditional rulers.

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NAFDAC Nabs Four In PH Over Fake Products

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The Management of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration (NAFDAC) has arrested four supermarket representatives for selling fake and unregistered products in Port Harcourt.
The agency said the four arrested persons would assist NAFDAC in its investigations on fake products.
This is as the agency has sealed off two sachet water factories in Diobu area for producing in an unhygienic environment and with an expired production licence.
The NAFDAC said the clampdown on the companies was to ensure that standards were maintained in producing sachet waters in the state.
This was contained in a statement made available to The Tide by NAFDAC Public Relations Officer, Cyril Monye, yesterday, in Port Harcourt.
NAFDAC said the two sealed factories were located at No. 28 Iloabuchi Street, Diobu; and No. 3, Ihute Street, Mile 3 Diobu; respectively.
The statement gave the names of the companies as B2 Table Water and William Table Water.
“The factories were not producing under good manufacturing practice, (GMP) and the initial setting of the factories have been altered and therefore not conformity with MAFDAC standards”, Monye said.
Earlier, Rivers State Coordinator, NAFDAC, Mrs. Chinelo Ejeh said that, “the agency regularly carries out routine inspections of establishment to ensure that no MAFDAC registered establishment deviates from standards”.
Similarly, NAFDAC state Coordinator Mrs. Chinelo Ejeh, has called on the Rivers State House of Assembly on Water Resources to assist NAFDAC with logistics and other incentives to carry out their regulatory activities.
Ejeh made this plea during a working visit to NAFDAC by the House Committee.
Speaking at the visit, Chairman, House Committee on Water, Hon Opuende Lolo said that they were in the agency to foster better working relationship and synergy in eradicating the incidences of unwholesome sachet water production in the state.

 

By: Chinedu Wosu

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Bayelsa Gov Appoints SSG, Others

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The Bayelsa State Governor, Senator Douye Diri, yesterday, approved the appointment of four principal officers for his administration.
This was disclosed in a statement by His Acting Chief Press Secretary, Mr. Daniel Alabrah.
The new appointees are a former Speaker of the state House of Assembly, Mr. Friday Konbowei Benson, who will serve as Secretary to the State Government, and Chief Benson Agadaga as Chief of Staff, Government House.
Others include Mr Peter Akpe as Deputy Chief of Staff and Mr. Irorodamie Komonibo as Principal Secretary to the governor.

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Nigeria Ranks 6th Worst In Global Child’s Wellbeing Survey

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Nigeria has been ranked among the bottom 10 countries performing poorly in terms of children’s well-being, coming 6th worst performing country in the world, according to a recent report released, yesterday by a commission convened by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and The Lancet.
The ranking is based on factors, including child survival, health, education, nutrition, equity and income gaps.
The report titled – ‘A Future for the World’s Children?’, based its rankings on factors, including measures of child survival and well-being such as health, education, nutrition, equity and income gaps.
A report rated Nigeria 174 out of 180 countries, lagging behind Afghanistan, Sierra Leone and South Sudan.
The UNICEF Nigeria Representative, Claes Johansson, in a statement, yesterday, said that the solution to ensuring that Nigerian children have a future was to invest in them.
“This report demonstrates how far we still need to go in Nigeria to ensure children can live healthy lives in an environment where they can thrive. We know that investing in the future of our children, giving them an education and making sure they are healthy and receive the right nutrition, works to provide a better future for everyone”, he said.
But while the survey suggests that poorer countries need to do more to support their children’s ability to live healthier lives, it has blamed wealthier countries for burdening the poor with excessive carbon emissions, a situation, it reports can lead to devastating health consequences for children, and increase the risk of diseases like malaria and dengue, and malnutrition.
“More than two billion people live in countries where development is hampered by humanitarian crises, conflicts, and natural disasters, problems increasingly linked with climate change”.
“While some of the poorest countries have among the lowest CO2 emissions, many are exposed to the harshest impacts of a rapidly changing climate. Promoting better conditions today for children to survive and thrive nationally does not have to come at the cost of eroding children’s futures globally,” Johansson said.
In its call to action to protect children, the independent commission’s authors recommends that there is an urgent need to stop CO2 emissions to ensure children have a future on this planet. It also recommends that – there is need to place children and adolescents at the centre of efforts to achieve sustainable development; create new policies and investment in all sectors to work towards child health and rights; incorporate children’s voices into policy decisions; and tighten national regulation of harmful commercial marketing, supported by a new Optional Protocol to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.
The report further added that while the poorest countries need to do more to support their children’s ability to live healthy lives, excessive carbon emissions – disproportionately from wealthier countries – threaten the future of all children. If global warming exceeds 4°C by the year 2100 in line with current projections, this would lead to devastating health consequences for children, due to rising ocean levels, heat waves, proliferation of diseases like malaria and dengue, and malnutrition.
The index shows that children in Norway, the Republic of Korea, and the Netherlands have the best chance at survival and well-being, while children in Central African Republic, Chad, Somalia, Niger and Mali face the worst odds.
“More than two billion people live in countries where development is hampered by humanitarian crises, conflicts, and natural disasters, problems increasingly linked with climate change,” Co-Chair of the commission and Minister Awa Coll-Seck from Senegal, said.
The Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet family of journals, Dr. Richard Horton, said: “The opportunity is great. The evidence is available. The tools are at hand. From heads-of-state to local government, from UN leaders to children themselves, this commission calls for the birth of a new era for child and adolescent health. It will take courage and commitment to deliver. It is the supreme test of our generation.
“From the climate crisis to obesity and harmful commercial marketing, children around the world have to contend with threats that were unimaginable just a few generations ago,” UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta Fore, said.
“It is time for a rethink on child health, one which places children at the top of every government’s development agenda and puts their well-being above all considerations.
“This report shows that the world’s decision makers are, too often, failing today’s children and youth: failing to protect their health, failing to protect their rights, and failing to protect their planet”.
The Director-General of the World Health Organization, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said: “This must be a wakeup call for countries to invest in child health and development, ensure their voices are heard, protect their rights, and build a future that is fit for children.”
However, Nigeria may not be alone in the negligence of its children as the report reveals that no single country in the world adequately protects the health, environment and the future of its young.
According to experts, these revelations indicate that the health and future of children worldwide was under immediate threat from ecological degradation, climate change and exploitative marketing as well as violence emanating from insurgency.
Expectedly, Nigeria is among this two billion under threat as more than half of its children bear the brunt of insurgency, terrorism and crime.
To ensure children are at the centre of efforts to achieve sustainable development, world bodies like the WHO and UNICEF say decision-makers must invest in protecting the rights of children.

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