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Nigeria Requires $100bn To Tackle Power Problems – Stakeholders

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The Nigeria Electricity Supply Industry, NESI, would require investments of over $100 billion in the next 20 years, to achieve a 24-hour daily supply in the country, stakeholders in the power sector have said.
The stakeholders met in Abuja for a 2-day seminar to discus and determine a strategic approach for the development of the Performance Improvement Plans (PIPs) 2020-2024, as recently requested by Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission, NERC.
The seminar was convened by Association of Nigerian Electricity Distributors, ANED, in collaboration with the European Union, EU, AFD, and USAID/Power Africa NPSP project, with the participation of DISCOs and other NESI stakeholders.
The Director, Research and Advocacy, ANED, Mr Sunday Oduntan, said that the PIPs guidelines issued by NERC were a key element of the Power Sector Recovery Programme, PSRP.
He said: “According to a recent study published by the French Development Agency and the European Union, Nigerian power distribution sector would need to invest more than USD 10 billion in the next five years to reach reasonable standards in quality of supply and service”.
“Indeed, NESI as a whole needs to invest more than USD 100 billion in the next 20 years if Nigeria wants to cover 24/7 hours of power supply to its citizens.
The preparation of the PIPs is an opportunity for DISCOs to set out what they intend to deliver to customers over the five-year period as well as the associated costs.
It is an output-based plan that states the target outputs over the planning horizon, the programmes and activities that will lead to the realisation of those outputs, the human and material resources required, the projected cost and analysis of the risk factors and their proposed mitigation measures. In this regard, PIPs will also be the basis for the defining realistic Performance Standards and Key Performance Indicators, KPIs, for the next five-year tariff period by the commission, with emphasis on improvement in energy throughput and delivery by DISCOs, reduction in Aggregate Technical/Commercial losses and overall improvement in service delivery to customers”.
Once approved by NERC, each DISCO’s PIPs will be a fundamental pillar of the major tariff review aimed at improving the Nigerian Electricity Supply Industry, NESI, as issued in the PSRP.
The process will involve a review of the application of the CAPEX in MYTO 2015 as the new revenue requirement of the sector should cover the investment and operating cost of efficiently providing electricity services to consumers.
Other parameters will also be updated in this major review such as inflation, gas price, foreign exchange rate, energy generated, etc. The approved PIP will be a public-facing document for DISCOs and it will be monitored by the commission to ensure that the DISCOs meet their commitments.
PIPs basically will cover four main plans that will be differently applied in the different market segments which include Operational Plans Distribution Master Plan, ATC&C Loss Reduction Plan, Customer Service Improvement Plan, Management Improvement Plans.

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Nigerians Spent N2.37trn On Petrol In 13 Months – NNPC

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The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) has said that, in 13 months, Nigerians spent N2.37 trillion on petrol imported into the country.
According to the data released by the corporation last Wednesday, its total revenue generated from the sales of white products for the period May 2019 to May 2020 stood at N2.39 trillion.
It disclosed that petrol contributed about 98.84 per cent of the total sales with a value of N2.37tn.
The corporation said it made N92.58bn through the sale of petrol in May 2020.
It said the revenue from petrol sale was generated through its subsidiary, the Petroleum Products Marketing Company, as the oil firm also announced a 43 per cent decrease in oil pipeline vandalism in May.
NNPC’s Group General Manager, Group Public Affairs Division, Kennie Obateru, explained that these were contained in the May 2020 version of the corporation’s Monthly Financial and Operations Report.
The report stated that the N92.58bn was made on the sale of white products (only petrol this time) by PPMC during the review period.
The oil firm said 950.67 million litres of white products were sold and distributed by the corporation’s downstream subsidiary, PPMC.
This comprised 950.67 million litres of Premium Motor Spirit, popularly called petrol, only, with no Automotive Gas Oil or Dual Purpose Kerosene.
There was also no sale of special product in the month.

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NCC Revises USSD Pricing, As 20 Seconds Cost N1.63

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The Nigerian Communications Commission, has revised the Unstructured Supplementary Service Data pricing to allow mobile network operators and financial institutions negotiate mutually beneficial rates.
The Executive Vice Chairman, NCC, Prof. Umar Danbatta, said the commission amended the determination earlier issued in July 2019 by removing the price floor and the cap.
According to him, each USSD session is 20 seconds and costs N1.63 per session on the MNO network.
He said the cost should form the basis of negotiations between MNOs and other related service providers using USSD channels.
The amendment was carried out after a dispute between MNOs and financial institutions on the applicable charges for USSD services and the method of billing.
The NCC, in the amended determination which took effect from August 1, said that if MNOs and financial service providers were unable to agree on rates, it would intervene and the commission’s decision would be final and binding.
The telecoms regulators said refusal to pay for services provided or to negotiate in good faith would lead to discontinuation of provision of the service, the possible withdrawal of the USSD short code and/ or imposition of regulatory sanctions.

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NIESV Laments Dilapidation Of RSHA Quarters

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The Nigerian Institution for Estate Surveyors and Valuers (NIESV) has described the Rivers State House of Assembly Quarters as being in bad shape and no longer befitting as a dwelling place for the legislators.
The president of the institution, Mr. Emma Okahs-Wike lamented that the Assembly Quarters could not have dilapidated to the extent of being marked for demolition if the property was maintained.
He noted that a facility of such nature should not have been left in the hands of the occupants, adding that the Rivers State government ought to have employed facility managers to take care of the quarters, noting that facility managers be engaged when the new proposed assembly quarters are completed.
According to him, if we had professionals who are managing the place, I can tell you that it would not have dilapidated to the point we are.
“I want to advise that the Speaker or the house officers should appoint facility managers that would be able to manage those properties. Now that the government is thinking about reconstructing, they should be able to bring out professionals, seek professional advice so that at the end of the day when they finish this kind of structure it would be properly cared for,” he continued.
Okahs-Wike reasoned that professional facility managers would be able to care for and maintain the facility, “let them not just leave it in the hands of the occupants, they should be able to have one stop facility manager that would look after the environment and make sure that the property is well maintained and well structured”.
While enjoining the state government to have the project reevaluated and get the public notified on the reason for demolition and rebuilding of the assembly quarters, the NIESV’s president pointed out that it would cost more to renovate the facility.
He explained: “the buildings, some of them are dilapidated. What I will advise the government to do is to carry out feasibility and viability study of that project. The feasibility is that demolishing and reconstructing, ‘which one would be better for us?’ Then you go to viability, which one would be more costly, which one would be more beneficial to the people? If the viability study says it’s good to renovate, you renovate, if they say no, you reconstruct. Now if the government has done that and they have found out that it would be more cost effective to reconstruct, it’s a better deal… and bring in current and modern building materials”.

 

 

Tonye Nria-Dappa

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