Expert Urges Women To Participate In Peace-Building

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Women the world over have been advised to actively participate in peace-building checking acts that could trigger crises in their respective communities.
Speaking with The Tide in Oyigbo last Tuesday, in an interview on the need for women’s contribution in peace-building globally, a renowned education expert and zonal Director of Ministry of Education, Oyigbo Local Government Area, Dr Mrs Christiana Sibor, said “women have the best source of information regarding the unpleasant activities of youths that could serve as a useful tool to enhance security in Nigeria”.
According to her, “the European Union (EU) funded project in partnership with the Federal and state, Ministries of Women Affairs and social Development is aimed at promoting women engagement in peace and security in Nigeria”.
As she puts it, “since women and children are more vulnerable in crises situations, it will not be out of place for women to be involved in peace-building in their communities”.
She said in every crisis, women and children are more vulnerable, stressing that, “they often are the majority of the people we see in internally displaced persons (IDPs) camp after any crisis. This is always the situations”.
The expert noted that when there is peace in any community, this class of people benefit more, adding that children can go to schools while the women can engage in several societal activities to keep their homes.
On the benefit of peace, Dr Sibor, explained that if the women benefit more when there is peace, it will be plausible for the people to be agents of peace-building in our communities”.
She further said that women must do everything possible to sustain peace and prevent crises. “Every conflict has indicators that mature with time and if not checked snowballs into crisis. Women are more observant when it comes to raising children. This makes them better placed to provide vital information”.
The educationist, however, said that if the women report unpleasant activities of their children that are being used by enemies of peace to security personnel, it would benefit the security personnel to nip the ugly scenario in the bud.
Here her: “Today, some women cover up for children r youths in their communities who engage in acts that jeopardize peace or could accelerate an already volatile situation”.
On roles of women in the society, Sibor called on government at all levels to organize aggressive seminar and workshop for women to enable them show-case their roles in order to prevent conflicts in their communities, appealing to them to be vigilant, sensitive and report any unpleasant acts to the security personnel as timely as possible.
Meanwhile, Int’l Widows Day is a global awareness day that takes place annual on 23rd June. The day was launched by the United Nations in 2010 to raise awareness of the violation of human rights that widows suffer in many countries following the death of their spouse.
In many countries with traditional societies, women find themselves left in poverty when their husbands die. In some countries, these women find themselves denied of inheritance and land rights, evicted from their homes, ostracized and abused.
The children of widows also often find themselves affected, withdrawn from school and more vulnerable to abuse, especially the girls.
Thus, International Widows Day works to encourage action in achieving full rights for widows, high lighting the need for more research and statistics into violence, discrimination and poverty suffered by widows. This is geared towards developing policies and programmes to address the problem.
The ultimate goal of the day is to develop resources and policies to empower widows and allow them have access to education, work, health care and lives free of violence and abuse. Enabling them to create a life for themselves and their children following the death of their husbands as well as ending a cycle of poverty and abuse.
Meanwhile, Int’l Widows Day is a global awareness day that takes place annual on 23rd June. The day was launched by the United Nations in 2010 to raise awareness of the violation of human rights that widows suffer in many countries following the death of their spouse.
In many countries with traditional societies, women find themselves left in poverty when their husbands die. In some countries, these women find themselves denied of inheritance and land rights, evicted from their homes, ostracized and abused.
The children of widows also often find themselves affected, withdrawn from school and more vulnerable to abuse, especially the girls.

 

Bethel Toby & Okoh Ekene