Ohio: The Jeep Controversy

0
916

In what seemed a robust final home run, in a presidential election that remains evenly tied, United States President Barack Obama will today storm three of four Midwestern battle ground states, that could determine eventual winner in tomorrow’s elections.

They are where pundits over the weekend called Obama’s safety net: Wisconson, Iowa and Ohio. The fourth equally contentious is Nevada. Should Obama win in these four, he would clinch as much as 277 electoral votes barring any surprises elsewhere, among other states ruled out as purely Democratic Party’s no-go-areas for Republican Contender and former Massachussetts Governor Mitt Romney.

Obama had visited Ohio each of the last two days, today’s his third where he hopes to close the campaign.

A key issue likely to determine a winner in Ohio, is what has come to be known as the Jeep Controversy.

It is a part of the debate on the economy, on a day (Friday) an encouraging October jobs report pumped up confidence in the Democratic fray, and gave President Obama an 11th-hour campaign boost, but perhaps, as captured by a Reuter’s analysis, more importantly one that could deny challenger Mitt Romney an opportunity to put an exclamation point on his argument that Obama has failed to turn around the US economy.

According to Friday’s report, U.S employers added 171,000 people to their pay rolls last month, significantly higher than 125,000 figure analysts had expected.

The jobless rate edged up a tenth of a point to 7.9 percent, due to workers surging back into the labour force.

Friday’s Labour Department report was more modest than last month’s stunning figure that pushed the unemployment rate down to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent, the lowest since 2009.

That fall was such a boost to Obama ahead of tomorrow’s election that it spawned some quickly discredited conspiracy theories, including former General Electric chairman, Jack Welch, that the White House had somehow manipulated the job figures for political gains, recalls Reuter’s, Patricia Zengevie in an article: Job Report May Help Obama In Tight Election Race posted same  day.

“This time around, the figure was neither so good nor all that bad, giving Republicans little to work with, although they stick with the message that is not what real recovery looks like,” she wrote.

Romney called the uptick in the unemployment rate a “sad reminder” that the economy continues to struggle, and said that, as president, he would “make real changes that would lead to a real recovery.

In Winscon, where polls show Romney trailing Obama, the Republican laid out the case for his election, saying that the jobs report was more evidence of the President’s failing leadership.

“The question of this election comes down to this: do you want more of the same or do you want real change? Romney said in a Suburb of Milwaukee after getting the endorsement of former Green Bay Packers Star quarter back Bart Starr.

Romney stepped up his attack at two stops in Ohio, including a huge rally in West Chester, a community near Cincinnati, where kid Rock warned up the crowd with the Romney signature song, Born Free and a host of Republican Leaders spoke.

“Your State is the one I’m counting on,” Romney told thousands of cheering supporters on a chilly night. This is the one we have to win.”

On his stop in Ohio, easily the most heavily contested swing State and a vital cog in the electoral math for both candidates, Obama, had said, last Friday that the October jobs report was evidence “we have made-real progress.”

Obama, whose federal rescue of the auto industry has been popular in a State where one in eight jobs is auto industry-related, hammered Romney for a recent statement that Chrysler a major auto manufacturing company planned to move Jeep Production to China, a suggestion the foremost Jeep manufacturing firm had refuted, noting it was adding workers to build more jeeps in Ohio, and the two camps-have since been airing advertisement over the issue.

Obama said Romney, who had opposed a government auto bailout was trying to scare workers in a desperate bid to make-up ground in Ohio.

“I know we are close to an election, but this isn’t a game; These are people’s jobs, these are people’s lives,” Obama said.

“You don’t scare hard-working Americans just to scare up some votes.”

Obama’s advisers said the Jeep controversy, which has featured heavily in the State’s Media, had helped the President solidify his lead in Ohio.

“We all felt prior to this week we were in very solid shape in the State of Ohio and our expectation is that our position has been strengthened by this,” White House Senior Adviser, David Plouff was quoted by Reuters as telling reporters.

While campaigning in the Mid Western heartland, Obama’s team was casting an eye on the Northeast where New York-area motorists were scrambling for gasoline on a third day of panic buying after Super Storm Sandy devastated the area.

Obama had won plaudits for turning his attention to storm relief earlier last week, but growing frustration among victims could be injurious.

In what seemed a robust final home run, in a presidential election that remains evenly tied, United States President Barack Obama will today storm three of four Midwestern battle ground states, that could determine eventual winner in tomorrow’s elections.

They are where pundits over the weekend called Obama’s safety net: Wisconson, Iowa and Ohio. The fourth equally contentious is Nevada. Should Obama win in these four, he would clinch as much as 277 electoral votes barring any surprises elsewhere, among other states ruled out as purely Democratic Party’s no-go-areas for Republican Contender and former Massachussetts Governor Mitt Romney.

Obama had visited Ohio each of the last two days, today’s his third where he hopes to close the campaign.

A key issue likely to determine a winner in Ohio, is what has come to be known as the Jeep Controversy.

It is a part of the debate on the economy, on a day (Friday) an encouraging October jobs report pumped up confidence in the Democratic fray, and gave President Obama an 11th-hour campaign boost, but perhaps, as captured by a Reuter’s analysis, more importantly one that could deny challenger Mitt Romney an opportunity to put an exclamation point on his argument that Obama has failed to turn around the US economy.

According to Friday’s report, U.S employers added 171,000 people to their pay rolls last month, significantly higher than 125,000 figure analysts had expected.

The jobless rate edged up a tenth of a point to 7.9 percent, due to workers surging back into the labour force.

Friday’s Labour Department report was more modest than last month’s stunning figure that pushed the unemployment rate down to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent, the lowest since 2009.

That fall was such a boost to Obama ahead of tomorrow’s election that it spawned some quickly discredited conspiracy theories, including former General Electric chairman, Jack Welch, that the White House had somehow manipulated the job figures for political gains, recalls Reuter’s, Patricia Zengevie in an article: Job Report May Help Obama In Tight Election Race posted same  day.

“This time around, the figure was neither so good nor all that bad, giving Republicans little to work with, although they stick with the message that is not what real recovery looks like,” she wrote.

Romney called the uptick in the unemployment rate a “sad reminder” that the economy continues to struggle, and said that, as president, he would “make real changes that would lead to a real recovery.

In Winscon, where polls show Romney trailing Obama, the Republican laid out the case for his election, saying that the jobs report was more evidence of the President’s failing leadership.

“The question of this election comes down to this: do you want more of the same or do you want real change? Romney said in a Suburb of Milwaukee after getting the endorsement of former Green Bay Packers Star quarter back Bart Starr.

Romney stepped up his attack at two stops in Ohio, including a huge rally in West Chester, a community near Cincinnati, where kid Rock warned up the crowd with the Romney signature song, Born Free and a host of Republican Leaders spoke.

“Your State is the one I’m counting on,” Romney told thousands of cheering supporters on a chilly night. This is the one we have to win.”

On his stop in Ohio, easily the most heavily contested swing State and a vital cog in the electoral math for both candidates, Obama, had said, last Friday that the October jobs report was evidence “we have made-real progress.”

Obama, whose federal rescue of the auto industry has been popular in a State where one in eight jobs is auto industry-related, hammered Romney for a recent statement that Chrysler a major auto manufacturing company planned to move Jeep Production to China, a suggestion the foremost Jeep manufacturing firm had refuted, noting it was adding workers to build more jeeps in Ohio, and the two camps-have since been airing advertisement over the issue.

Obama said Romney, who had opposed a government auto bailout was trying to scare workers in a desperate bid to make-up ground in Ohio.

“I know we are close to an election, but this isn’t a game; These are people’s jobs, these are people’s lives,” Obama said.

“You don’t scare hard-working Americans just to scare up some votes.”

Obama’s advisers said the Jeep controversy, which has featured heavily in the State’s Media, had helped the President solidify his lead in Ohio.

“We all felt prior to this week we were in very solid shape in the State of Ohio and our expectation is that our position has been strengthened by this,” White House Senior Adviser, David Plouff was quoted by Reuters as telling reporters.

While campaigning in the Mid Western heartland, Obama’s team was casting an eye on the Northeast where New York-area motorists were scrambling for gasoline on a third day of panic buying after Super Storm Sandy devastated the area.

Obama had won plaudits for turning his attention to storm relief earlier last week, but growing frustration among victims could be injurious.