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Strategising For Rivers Electricity Grid

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It is inexplicable that despite the
abundant sources and resources of energy at Nigeria’s disposal, it is still
difficult for the citizens to enjoy efficient power supply. About seven years,
after the Power Sector Reform Act 2005, we are yet to move to the point of
counting our benefits.

What baffles one most is that despite all
the efforts made by the Federal Government in this regard and the huge amount
sunk into the power sector to revamp it, there is no remarkable improvement. A
total of $16 billion has been poured for 10 years, yet the whole business is
stinking, not much has changed, sounding like a hoax every passing day.

It is the exclusive responsibility of the
federal government to give the people the opportunity to enjoy affordable and
accessible stable electricity. What the nation needs at this time are scores of
compact micro-schemes to deliver power off grid to take the hook off the inept
Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN).

So, as the PHCN is warming up for
privatization before the end of this year, it is pertinent that state
governments and private investors take over the distribution and transmission
of electricity in Nigeria. There are gas, coal and water resources available
for exploit to the advantage of the power sector. Independent Power Projects
(IPP) will enable state governments deliver services that are so critical to
the welfare of the people.

It is high time we began to question the
reasoning behind retaining any monopoly in the value delivery chain which is a
negation of the liberal mantra of the present administration under President
Goodluck Jonathan. The Power Holding Company of Nigeria originally christened
Electricity Corporation of Nigeria (ECN) and later called the National
Electricity Power Authority (NEPA) has outlived its usefulness.

The corporation or organization is not
living up to its bidding both in distribution and transmission, so it is good
enough for privatisation. Current realities show that  transmission suffers the auctioneers hammer.
There is a drastic and constant drop in the power supply ocean. Obviously, not
much has changed in the power scene, the chain remains as unreliable as ever.

The Rivers State Government during a press
conference in Port Harcourt recently called on the Federal Government to
dispose of its distribution aspect to the private sector operators so that they
can run them as business, bring in efficiency and make power available to our
people.

The Commissioner for Power, Hon. Augustine
Wokocha who addressed the conference said: “We are prepared, as a government to
invest into distribution despite  the
fact that it is not part of our responsibility. People are tired of hearing
megawatts, megawatts, they want to see just one watt. The issue of power
distribution is the exclusive property of the Federal Government via the PHCN”.

According to him, the government’s
objective is to provide regular power for the people. “Our driving force is not
to make profit but for our people to make profit for themselves and the
improvement of the economy of the state to be independent and self-sustaining”.
The government, as he puts it, is acting as a catalyst to the industrial and
economic development of the state, noting, however, that it will partner with a
private sector outfit that will buy the generation aspect, of which discussion
is on-going.

The commissioner disclosed that the state
government is strategising itself towards creating own grid in the state such
that “all our generation will be on that grid and the power supply not from
one, generation point. However,  he added
we are conscious of the fact that at the beginning, the demand will jump up, so
we are determined to establish a reasonable capacity and to ensure that other
Nigerians can enjoy what we are doing”.

He explained that for now, the Rivers State
Government has a sharing arrangement with the PHCN to the ratio of 70:30,
pointing out that the governor in 2008 had said that about N22 billion arose
from that agreement for which PHCN has not paid anything and it is running into
N100 billion by now. “The amount is based on what we have generated from the
70:30 formula and given to PHCN”. The government has 70 while PHCN takes 30.

On the way forward, Wokocha explained that
the state is not going to depend on the sharing any more as a modality for
power purchase agreement is being worked out whereby PHCN will buy what the
government is generating and pay for it.

Many states including Rivers State are
anxiously waiting for the whistle to blast for them to invest their resources
in power generation. But it is worthy of note that the situation where states
would invest their hard-earned money in power generation only to have the
output wheeled into the national grid by an arrogant Federal Government is not
encouraging.

Federal Government should allow states move
into the venture of power distribution and transmission if we are to have a
durable framework for captive power generation. From its four gas turbines, the
Rivers State government under the IPP has 180 megawatts of electricity and
hopes to increase if given the free hand.

Today, the Lagos State Government has
delivered the Akute Power Project – a 12 MW Plant dedicated to the state water
corporation with another IPP to deliver 15 MW in two phases to serve the
Central Lagos Business District on course, and many more which are off-grid
underway.

There are reports that limited gas supply
is one of the major challenges facing the eight gas turbines in the country –
NIPP Power Plant, Egbin Power Plant, Olorunsogo Plant, Alaoji Power Plant,
Ihovbor Power Plant, Calabar Power Plant, Gbarain  Power Plant and Omotosho Power Plant. The 304
MGW installed capacity eight gas turbines power plants in the country built and
inaugurated about five years ago have practically packed up and six of them
broken down.

The issue of gas needs in this country is
one that the Federal Government has not given adequate  thought. Until this matter is sorted out and
bound to impact the power sector, the problem of power shortage and outage
would continue to rear its ugly head. The issue of gas supply slow down the
operations of most of the turbines in the country.

In 2010, government’s efforts at improving
power supply got a boost with the commencement of gas supply to the PHCN
facilities. Pan Ocean Oil Corporation (POOC), operator of the NNPC Pan Ocean
Joint Venture commenced supply of gas to the Nigerian Gas Company (NGC) to be
conveyed eventually to PHCN power generating plants. It supplied 50 million
standard cubic feet per day (mmscf/d) of gas to the NGC from its Ovade-Osharefe
gas processing plant.

The flares out directive of the Federal
Government must be adhered to by oil and gas companies. With the gas processing
plants and pipelines which transverse the country, one would think that the
challenge of gas supply is no issue. Oando has so far expended more than N18
billion to develop a 128KM cross-country gas pipeline traversing Akwa Ibom and
Cross River States and has an installed capacity of 100 mmscfd of gas.

The move by the Federal Government
currently to facilitate the supply of gas to companies should be intensified
and implemented to the letter. A team is on a weeklong tour of gas
installations for this purpose. This will go a long way to actualise the hope
that 75 per cent of electricity can come out from natural gas. Nigeria has past
the stage of Kainji and shortage of gas to generate electricity. We have more
than enough gas resources for power generation, so the Federal Government must
be alive to its responsibility by ensuring that sufficient gas is supplied to
power our turbines at all levels.

If the Federal Government means that its
plans for improved power  supply must
come to fruition, it must afford to compromise handing over the power busiess
to investors and be serious about the Power Agenda. It should ensure that
whoever gets the power generation, transmission and distribution assets must be
an investor who has the will-power to improve on it and  not the type that would further resell to
another investor thereafter, thereby compounding the power problem being
suffered by the citizens. The new tariff billed to commence from June 1 should
be put on hold until the power supply improves.

Federal Government investment in power has
not been able to translate into stable power because of lack of accountability
but if the government had done the right thing to design a mechanism to restore
confidence in the power sector, a good result would have been recorded before
now. Statistics show that the power generation target set for 2011 was 5,000
Megawatts, achievement was 4420MW while target for 2012 was 6,000MW but has
crashed to 3200MW resulting in the sacking of some top officials of the PHCN
recently. The uncooperative attitude of some staff of PHCN reveals that there
are major threats to the actualisation of the new power reforms.

To ensure sufficient gas supply for our
power, not just international oil companies should participate in the gas
project of this country but also indigenous firms should be given priority
attention or consideration. Gas to power distribution is a boost the country
badly needs and there must be a corrupt-free national strategy for managing the
gas revenues because the worry about monies generated from the oil ad gas
sector in this country is the ‘course’ of embezzlement and misappropriation. We
must try to avoid the mistakes of the past. Nigeria is a democracy everybody is
watching, so it is expected that there is going to be improvement in the power
sector with the Power Road Map of the present administration. President
Jonathan should exert the political will to actualize the programme.

Our power sector needs a lot of gas, so
there should be concerted efforts to develop our gas resources as never done by
past administrations. Nigeria has large gas resources and so should subsidise
the product for easy reach and domestic consumption. Nigeria is adjudged the
world’s seventh largest producer of high grade gas with zero per cent surplus
and rich in natural gas liquids. It is a universal knowledge that no country
attains the status of industrialization without the impacting influence of
power supply.

 

 

Shedie Okpara

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Oil & Energy

MoniPulo Empowers 70 In Akwa Ibom

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A total of 70 indigenes of Mbo Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State, host to an indigenous oil firm, Moni Pulo Petroleum Development, have benefited from the 2021 community empowerment programme of the company.
The empowerment programme, which is in the 12th cycle, saw to the distribution of 70 motorcycles to the benefiting members of the host communities.
Speaking, the Chairman and Chief Executive of Moni Pulo, Dr. Seinye O.B. Lulu-Briggs, said the company has had a very healthy relationship with the people of Mbo LGA and has left positive footprints since 1999.
Lulu-Briggs said the company believes that provision of an economic-enabling environment, sustainable employment, secured opportunities and human capital development in Mbo LGA, remain the guiding principle for social transformation.
She emphasised that the company has a passion for transforming communities and catalyzing personal and communal growth in a sustainable manner, which is why corporate social responsibility is her cherished core corporate value.
“MPLs Corporate Focal Responsibility package is structured along four core areas: Educational Development, Skill Acquisition and Empowerment, Infrastructural Development, Sports and Social welfare.
“It is believed that capacity building will ameliorate the Niger Delta region’s economic challenges and reduce the incidences of youth restiveness. Thus, MPL takes this gesture further to empower Mbo and Effiat Community youths with high class motorcycles.
“This is the 12th cycle of our Community Empowerment Programme, and it is designed to empower 70 business Start-Ups from within Mbo Local Government Area in Akwa lbom State.”
Lulu-Briggs represented by the Head pf Administration and Community, Alabo Clifford Daerego, said MPL’s empowerment programme provides opportunites for entrepreneurs to set up and establish businesses that will help increase the employment rate in Akwa lbom State and in the country.
“A review of the social responsibility projects we have carried out in Mbo Local Government Area, reveals that our activities have aligned with the current global Sustainable Development Goals. This Community Empowerment Programme hinges on SDG Goal 8, which is to promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.
Despite the socio-economic challenges that we, like everyone else, have had to weather, we have continued to invest in the wellbeing of our host communities through empowerment exercises and sustainable development projects. We have done and will continue to do this because we know that ultimately our work is about people the men, women, youth and children of Mbo and Effiat.”
Also speaking, Akwa Ibom State Commissioner for Power and Petroleum Development, Dr. John James Etim, who commended Moni Pulo for being a good corporate citizen, expressed delight to witnessed the empowerment programme.
Etim disclosed that upon his assumption of office, he was briefed that the company has trained many members of her host communities in several skills and also awarded university scholarships to many.

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DPR Resolves 48 Oil Industry Disputes In Three Months

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The Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) says a total number of 48 dispute cases in the oil and gas industry have been resolved since inauguration of its Alternative Dispute Resolution Centre (ADRC).
Sarki Auwalu, DPR director/chief executive officer, said this during the petroleum club’s second quarter business dinner on Wednesday.
The ADRC is one of the units in the National Oil and Gas Excellence Centre (NOGEC) established by Muhammadu Buhari on January 21, 2021.
The resolution centre was inaugurated in April 2021 with the principal aim of providing a platform where disputes in the industry could be settled in a timely, cost-effective, and mutually agreeable manner.
Auwalu said: “The centre is involved in mediation, reconciliation and arbitration. After the inauguration of the centre, we resolved about 48 cases, and right now, we have over 223 cases.
“Notable among them is the first case that we resolved which had been on for 18 years. It was resolved by simple mediation”.
DPR had announced that the ADRC, which fully commenced operations in May, has a six-member advisory council and a 20-member body of neutrals which has been mediating on disputes between players in the oil and gas value chain.
The members of the Advisory council include Auwalu as chairman, Saliu Said, Cecelia Olatoregun, Bayo Ojo, Daere Akobo, and Nicholas Odinuwe.

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World’s Recoverable Oil Resources Shrinks By 9%

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Every year and following the publication of the BP Statistical Review, Rystad Energy releases its own assessment to provide an independent, solid and clear comparison of how the world’s energy landscape changed last year. Our 2021 review deals a major blow for the size of the world’s remaining recoverable oil resources, but it also shows that oil production and consumption can align with climate goals.
Rystad Energy now estimates total recoverable oil resources at 1,725 billion barrels, a significant reduction of last year’s estimate of 1,903 billion barrels. Out of this total, which shows our estimate of how much oil is technically recoverable in the future, about 1,300 billion barrels are sufficiently profitable to be produced before the year 2100 at a Brent real oil price of $50 per barrel.
“In this scenario, global production of oil and natural gas liquids will fall below 50 million barrels per day by 2050. Exploring, developing, processing and consuming this amount of commercially extractable oil will lead to gross greenhouse gas emissions of less than 450 gigatonnes of CO2 from now until 2100. This is compliant with IPCC’s carbon budget for global warming limited to 1.8?C by 2100,” says Rystad Energy’s Head of Analysis, Per Magnus Nysveen.
This year’s review of global recoverable oil resources is based on resources modelled at well level rather than field level. This more detailed approach has removed 178 billion barrels from the expected accounts as the confidence level for decline rates has increased with the amount of new information gathered.
Our updated report also includes revisions for proved reserves. Here Rystad Energy applies a consistent set of conservative probabilities, as opposed to official reporting by authorities which is deemed less consistent. Among other findings, we see significant differences among OPEC members on the longevity of proved reserves, ranging from well below 10 years for some members to almost 20 years for Saudi Arabia and the UAE.
In terms of absolute volumes removed from non-OPEC producers, remaining recoverable resources in the US are now reduced to 214 billion barrels, losing 30 billion barrels from last year’s estimate. China suffers the second-largest loss with its remaining recoverable resources now limited to 50 billion barrels, a down wards revision of 26 billion barrels. Mexico’s recoverable resources are third on the loss list, downgraded by 12 billion barrels to 26 billion barrels. Most of this year’s revisions are driven by lower upside potential from shale oil drilling due to complex geology and the need for extensive exploration campaigns and improved fracking technologies.
The remaining recoverable resources of OPEC countries are reduced by 53 billion barrels to 741 billion barrels. Iran and Saudi Arabia have the largest revisions, losing 11 billion barrels each, with Saudi recoverable oil volumes now calculated at 288 billion barrels and Iranian volumes at 101 billion barrels. Iraq follows in third place, seeing its recoverable resources shrink by 8 billion barrels to 110 billion barrels.
In this revision, Saudi Arabia keeps the throne as the producer with the largest volumes of recoverable oil resources (288 billion barrels). The US follows second (214 billion barrels), Russia third (149 billion barrels) and Canada fourth (138 billion barrels).
In Central and South America, Brazil remains first in recoverable resources, sitting on 83 billion barrels (down 2 billion barrels from last year’s update). In Europe, with 19 billion barrels (down by 1 billion barrels in this update), Norway remains ahead of the UK, whose volumes have shrunk by 2 billion barrels to 10 billion. In Africa, resource leader Nigeria lost 6 billion barrels and its recoverable resources are now estimated at 20 billion barrels.
Unlike most countries in our analysis, Australia’s estimated recoverable oil resources are now seen higher by 2 billion barrels at 23 billion barrels.
The time stamp of Rystad Energy’s newest resource assessment is 1 January 2021. In other words, our analysis illustrates where the remaining recoverable resources of each country stood at the beginning of this year.
Culled from Rystad Energy

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