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Time To Implement Local Content Act 2010

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A visit to Nigeria airports, especially the Port Harcourt International Airport, Omagwa shows an influx of so-called foreign experts into the country almost on daily basis. When asked who they are and where they are going, the answer is always, “they are expatriates coming for one oil company or another. With this observation, one is poised to ask whether the oil companies in the country are actually working in consonance with the Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development Act, 2010.

President Goodluck Jonathan in September 2010 inaugurated the Governing Council of the Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring Board (NCDMB) during which he charged the board to ensure that its activities impacted on the oil and gas sector. He said the initiative must count on indigenous capacity development in the oil and gas industry. With the inauguration, the NCDMB was fully equipped to commence operations to meet the expectation of Nigerians in the gradual but sustainable implementation of the Nigerian Content Act.

The Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development Act, 2010 aims to provide for the development of Nigerian content in the Nigerian oil and gas industry, Nigerian content plan, supervision, coordination, monitoring and implementation of Nigerian content and for related matters. Enacted by the National Assembly of Nigeria, the Act, not withstanding anything to the contrary contained in the Petroleum Act, which shall apply to all matters pertaining to Nigerian content in respect of all operations or transactions, carried out in or connected with the Nigerian oil and gas industry.

And among other matters, all regulatory authorities, operators, contractors, subcontractors, alliance partners and other entities involved in any project, operation, activity or transaction in the Nigerian oil and gas industry shall consider Nigeria content as an important element of their overall project development and management philosophy for project execution.

The Executive Secretary of the NCDMB, Mr Ernest Nwapa on Thursday at the 2012 Nigerian Oil and Gas (NOG) conference in Abuja explained that the implementation of the Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry Content Development (NOGIC) Act was geared to bring Nigerian jobs back home. Mr Nwapa said the board would ensure that all technology required to develop the local content was deployed to the country to create greater opportunities for Nigerians, pointing out that the emphasis of the Federal Government with the implementation of the Act was not only to retain the bulk of the annual oil and gas industry spend in the country, but ultimately to create employment for millions of Nigerians on the back of oil and gas industry operations.

He noted that most countries around the world were currently working towards bringing back jobs for their nationals in the wake of the global economic crisis and urged all stakeholders to support this agenda of the Federal Government. According to Nwapa, keeping the cost of production reasonable and meeting work schedules are critical to national revenue.

With the caliber of members of the Governing Council of the Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring Board head by the Minister of Petroleum Resources, Mrs Diezani Alison-Madueke, one would have thought that the Act should have by now been strictly enforced for compliance by oil and gas companies in the country. The Act if properly enforced will propel Nigeria into becoming one of the world’s industrialised economies in the next decade.

Nigeria needs to urgently address the issue of local capacity in the oil and gas industry so as to take advantage of expected investments and guard against the repeat of past mistakes where most goods and services used in the industry were imported, while facilities that were built suffered from inadequate after sales service support. The preference for importing almost all the goods and services used by the industry from abroad is steadily eliminating opportunities to develop human and infrastructural capacity, thereby impoverishing our people and stultifying national economic development.

We must ensure that our implementation efforts do not fail and we must be consistent and unwavering in order to transform our industry from an importer of goods and services to an industry that can source its key imputs from local resources. The oil and gas industry can generate manufacturing activities to support its operations and employment and domicile significant proportions of its derivatives as well as trap commensurate revenue in Nigeria to develop the fabrication yards, shipyards and manufacturing plants to industrialise our economy.

Major cities like Lagos, Abuja, Port Harcourt, Kano, Jos, to mention just a few, like the proverbial honeybee, easily attract prospective foreigners into the country so must and many foreign experts who appear to have literarily struck gold in the country capitalise on the quest of industries for them to simply hijack available positions meant for indigenes. These industries, particularly the oil multinationals refuse to know that Nigerians also have the right skills that are high on demand.

An immigration official who did not want his name on print because he had no authority to speak on the issue, revealed to journalists that the office receives hundreds of applications from prospective foreigners seeking temporary permits in the country on daily basis. His words: “In recent time, we have been receiving a deluge of applications form would-be expatriates seeking work permits. What we do when such applications come, under the circumstance, is to do thorough background checks and treat each ease on its merit”.

Investigations have revealed that foreigners appear to dominate key sectors of the country’s economy such as oil and gas, energy and power, construction, telecommunications, real estate, banking and finance, among others. The Vice Chairman, Broron Group of Companies, Mr Henry Ojogho, a conglomerate with interest in oil and gas, telecommunications, energy and power, in an interview disclosed that foreigners still dominate most businesses in the country today. Specifically citing the oil and gas industry, ojogho said that the country has the right local experts for most of these jobs.

He was, however, quick to admit that there are lots of handicaps militating against the capacity of local experts to deliver on the job when compared to their peers abroad. “In Nigeria, I can tell you in all honesty that we have expertise that can compete favourably with their counterparts abroad but they are hamstrung by the lack of capacity. What do you make of a professional involved in seizure engineering who has no equipment to do these jobs?, he stressed.

The President of the Association of consulting Architect of Nigeria Architect Roti Delano,in another interview decried what he described as the “invasion of foreign architecture” in the country. He said: “We have had other foreign architects working in the country but the problem we are having now is the incursion of foreign architects practicing illegally in Nigeria. Some clients engage these people in ignorance and we know of clients, who when this is drawn to their attention, reverse the situation”.

Delano continued: “It is not only the clients that are encouraging foreign people coming to practice illegally in Nigeria, we have instances where the Federal Government engages foreign architects to work illegally in Nigeria. Part of the problems we are going through now is trying to make our clients realise that the Nigerian architects”. He recalled that when President Olusegun Obasanjo was Head of the Military Government in the 1970s and the country was building the second generation universities at the time, all the projects went to Nigerian artchitects provided they showed they have the technical expertise.

The cost of engaging a local architect or expert in any field is a fraction of what you pay the foreign person. Several studies have shown that in about 37 countries, Nigerian professionals earn the least pay while the Federal Government pays a lot of money for consultancy services for those coming from abroad. The government flies them in an pays them heavily for what other Nigerians here can do in a lesser time than the foreigner can achieve. The government must look into this.

Expenditure in the industrial sector of the country must transcend returns in terms of revenue and also translate to local capacity, increased technological growth, jobs for Nigerians, assets and develop critical facilities and infrastructure to support performance of work scopes in Nigeria.

It is now necessary for the Governing Council of the Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring  Board to develop partnership between local and international companies, government, and gas companies and the private sector of the economy and create linkage with all sectors of the economy, local banks and global financing institutions to create the enabling environment for local capacity building. There must be developments in our supply chain management, the integration of government programmes such as Small and Medium Enterprises, training by the Petroleum Training and Development Fund (PTDF), Industrial Training Fund (ITF), National Office for Technology Acquisition and Promotion (NOTAP), to build local capabilities across board and transfer the technological experience inherent in the oil and gas industry to other sectors like transportation, construction, telecommunications, power, defence, maritime among others.

The NCDMB should create access to funds by leveraging the reforms in the banking sector to design interventions that support local companies with low interests and long-term loans. The board should also sensitise indigenes of oil producing communities on government’s genuine intentions to empower their youths, protect the environment, secure lives and property and ensure their participation in economic activities to maintain the tranquil environment required to support productive industry activities.

 

Shedie Okpara

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MoniPulo Empowers 70 In Akwa Ibom

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A total of 70 indigenes of Mbo Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State, host to an indigenous oil firm, Moni Pulo Petroleum Development, have benefited from the 2021 community empowerment programme of the company.
The empowerment programme, which is in the 12th cycle, saw to the distribution of 70 motorcycles to the benefiting members of the host communities.
Speaking, the Chairman and Chief Executive of Moni Pulo, Dr. Seinye O.B. Lulu-Briggs, said the company has had a very healthy relationship with the people of Mbo LGA and has left positive footprints since 1999.
Lulu-Briggs said the company believes that provision of an economic-enabling environment, sustainable employment, secured opportunities and human capital development in Mbo LGA, remain the guiding principle for social transformation.
She emphasised that the company has a passion for transforming communities and catalyzing personal and communal growth in a sustainable manner, which is why corporate social responsibility is her cherished core corporate value.
“MPLs Corporate Focal Responsibility package is structured along four core areas: Educational Development, Skill Acquisition and Empowerment, Infrastructural Development, Sports and Social welfare.
“It is believed that capacity building will ameliorate the Niger Delta region’s economic challenges and reduce the incidences of youth restiveness. Thus, MPL takes this gesture further to empower Mbo and Effiat Community youths with high class motorcycles.
“This is the 12th cycle of our Community Empowerment Programme, and it is designed to empower 70 business Start-Ups from within Mbo Local Government Area in Akwa lbom State.”
Lulu-Briggs represented by the Head pf Administration and Community, Alabo Clifford Daerego, said MPL’s empowerment programme provides opportunites for entrepreneurs to set up and establish businesses that will help increase the employment rate in Akwa lbom State and in the country.
“A review of the social responsibility projects we have carried out in Mbo Local Government Area, reveals that our activities have aligned with the current global Sustainable Development Goals. This Community Empowerment Programme hinges on SDG Goal 8, which is to promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.
Despite the socio-economic challenges that we, like everyone else, have had to weather, we have continued to invest in the wellbeing of our host communities through empowerment exercises and sustainable development projects. We have done and will continue to do this because we know that ultimately our work is about people the men, women, youth and children of Mbo and Effiat.”
Also speaking, Akwa Ibom State Commissioner for Power and Petroleum Development, Dr. John James Etim, who commended Moni Pulo for being a good corporate citizen, expressed delight to witnessed the empowerment programme.
Etim disclosed that upon his assumption of office, he was briefed that the company has trained many members of her host communities in several skills and also awarded university scholarships to many.

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DPR Resolves 48 Oil Industry Disputes In Three Months

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The Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) says a total number of 48 dispute cases in the oil and gas industry have been resolved since inauguration of its Alternative Dispute Resolution Centre (ADRC).
Sarki Auwalu, DPR director/chief executive officer, said this during the petroleum club’s second quarter business dinner on Wednesday.
The ADRC is one of the units in the National Oil and Gas Excellence Centre (NOGEC) established by Muhammadu Buhari on January 21, 2021.
The resolution centre was inaugurated in April 2021 with the principal aim of providing a platform where disputes in the industry could be settled in a timely, cost-effective, and mutually agreeable manner.
Auwalu said: “The centre is involved in mediation, reconciliation and arbitration. After the inauguration of the centre, we resolved about 48 cases, and right now, we have over 223 cases.
“Notable among them is the first case that we resolved which had been on for 18 years. It was resolved by simple mediation”.
DPR had announced that the ADRC, which fully commenced operations in May, has a six-member advisory council and a 20-member body of neutrals which has been mediating on disputes between players in the oil and gas value chain.
The members of the Advisory council include Auwalu as chairman, Saliu Said, Cecelia Olatoregun, Bayo Ojo, Daere Akobo, and Nicholas Odinuwe.

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World’s Recoverable Oil Resources Shrinks By 9%

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Every year and following the publication of the BP Statistical Review, Rystad Energy releases its own assessment to provide an independent, solid and clear comparison of how the world’s energy landscape changed last year. Our 2021 review deals a major blow for the size of the world’s remaining recoverable oil resources, but it also shows that oil production and consumption can align with climate goals.
Rystad Energy now estimates total recoverable oil resources at 1,725 billion barrels, a significant reduction of last year’s estimate of 1,903 billion barrels. Out of this total, which shows our estimate of how much oil is technically recoverable in the future, about 1,300 billion barrels are sufficiently profitable to be produced before the year 2100 at a Brent real oil price of $50 per barrel.
“In this scenario, global production of oil and natural gas liquids will fall below 50 million barrels per day by 2050. Exploring, developing, processing and consuming this amount of commercially extractable oil will lead to gross greenhouse gas emissions of less than 450 gigatonnes of CO2 from now until 2100. This is compliant with IPCC’s carbon budget for global warming limited to 1.8?C by 2100,” says Rystad Energy’s Head of Analysis, Per Magnus Nysveen.
This year’s review of global recoverable oil resources is based on resources modelled at well level rather than field level. This more detailed approach has removed 178 billion barrels from the expected accounts as the confidence level for decline rates has increased with the amount of new information gathered.
Our updated report also includes revisions for proved reserves. Here Rystad Energy applies a consistent set of conservative probabilities, as opposed to official reporting by authorities which is deemed less consistent. Among other findings, we see significant differences among OPEC members on the longevity of proved reserves, ranging from well below 10 years for some members to almost 20 years for Saudi Arabia and the UAE.
In terms of absolute volumes removed from non-OPEC producers, remaining recoverable resources in the US are now reduced to 214 billion barrels, losing 30 billion barrels from last year’s estimate. China suffers the second-largest loss with its remaining recoverable resources now limited to 50 billion barrels, a down wards revision of 26 billion barrels. Mexico’s recoverable resources are third on the loss list, downgraded by 12 billion barrels to 26 billion barrels. Most of this year’s revisions are driven by lower upside potential from shale oil drilling due to complex geology and the need for extensive exploration campaigns and improved fracking technologies.
The remaining recoverable resources of OPEC countries are reduced by 53 billion barrels to 741 billion barrels. Iran and Saudi Arabia have the largest revisions, losing 11 billion barrels each, with Saudi recoverable oil volumes now calculated at 288 billion barrels and Iranian volumes at 101 billion barrels. Iraq follows in third place, seeing its recoverable resources shrink by 8 billion barrels to 110 billion barrels.
In this revision, Saudi Arabia keeps the throne as the producer with the largest volumes of recoverable oil resources (288 billion barrels). The US follows second (214 billion barrels), Russia third (149 billion barrels) and Canada fourth (138 billion barrels).
In Central and South America, Brazil remains first in recoverable resources, sitting on 83 billion barrels (down 2 billion barrels from last year’s update). In Europe, with 19 billion barrels (down by 1 billion barrels in this update), Norway remains ahead of the UK, whose volumes have shrunk by 2 billion barrels to 10 billion. In Africa, resource leader Nigeria lost 6 billion barrels and its recoverable resources are now estimated at 20 billion barrels.
Unlike most countries in our analysis, Australia’s estimated recoverable oil resources are now seen higher by 2 billion barrels at 23 billion barrels.
The time stamp of Rystad Energy’s newest resource assessment is 1 January 2021. In other words, our analysis illustrates where the remaining recoverable resources of each country stood at the beginning of this year.
Culled from Rystad Energy

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