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Unique Simple Style Of Genevieve Our Model the known actress Geneviene

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She stands out as one of the best-known Nigerian actresses and her fame spreads beyond the shores of the land. Genevieve Nnaji, talented Nollywood actress, face of Lux, and of recent, budding songstress, may as well add supermodel to her portfolio, going by her performance during the Pink Ball catwalk segment.

The pixy-ish, sassy-posing cutie with the sultry looks gave a good account of herself as she sashayed down the runway in a trendy, yet sophisticated bugle-beaded bodice halter-neck number with a plunging neckline and sexy tapered skirt. In her mid-twenties, the single mother of one is all in support of breast cancer awareness and, knowing that breast cancer is not selective; she believes that all hands should be on deck to curb the deadly scourge.

The plucky superstar has this to say of her talents, which she attributes to a keen interest and personal effort, “You are your own best trainer.” Having done so well in Nollywood, Nnaji, who also professes a flair for designing, believes that Hollywood naturally is the nest level for her.jul1009fashion1

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Fashion

Glitz, Glamour Of The Eve Afrique Red Ball

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Eve Afrique hosted her annual  Red Ball event at Hago Heights Event Centre,Peter Odili Road, Port Harcourt recently with the theme;” “Together Securing Development and Peace across the Niger Delta”.
It was fun-filled with fashion statement gowns at the Red Ball event. The colour was Sien, dramatic and perfect for the mood. Fabulous designs and some seriously interesting sleeve works were at play.
Stunning and glimmering evening gowns stood out. Ladies, check out some of the designs and go for them.

By: Ibinabo Ogolo

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Celebrating International Widows Day

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International Widows’ Day is a global awareness day that takes place annually on 23rd June. The day was launched by the United Nations in 2010 to raise awareness on the violation of human rights that widows suffer in many countries following the death of their spouses.
In many countries with traditional societies, women find themselves left in poverty when their husbands die. In some countries, these women find themselves denied of inheritance and land rights, evicted from their homes, ostracised and abused. The children of widows also often find themselves affected, withdrawn from school and more vulnerable to abuse, especially in the case of girls.
International Widows’ Day works to encourage action in achieving full rights for widows, highlighting the need for more research and statistics into violence, discrimination and poverty suffered by widows and develop policies and programmes to address the problem.
The ultimate goal of the day is to develop resources and policy to empower widows and allow them to have access to education, work, healthcare and live free of violence and abuse. Enabling them to create a life for themselves and their children following the death of their husbands and ending a cycle of poverty and abuse. 
International Widows’ Day is an initiative of the Loomba Foundation, launched at the House of Lords in London on 26 May 2005.
Following the launch, the Loomba Foundation led a five-year global campaign for UN recognition, which resulted in an unanimous decision to adopt International Widows’ Day as an annual global day of action by the UN General Assembly in December 2010.
Since then, International Widows’ Day has provided a focus for campaigning in many countries around the world, with opportunities to create awareness in communities and engage governments in developing effective policies. Much has already been achieved but, as Lord Loomba points out, millions remain in urgent need, and “we’ve barely started yet”.

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Fashion

Celebrating International Widows Day

Published

on

International Widows’ Day is a global awareness day that takes place annually on 23rd June. The day was launched by the United Nations in 2010 to raise awareness on the violation of human rights that widows suffer in many countries following the death of their spouses.
In many countries with traditional societies, women find themselves left in poverty when their husbands die. In some countries, these women find themselves denied of inheritance and land rights, evicted from their homes, ostracised and abused. The children of widows also often find themselves affected, withdrawn from school and more vulnerable to abuse, especially in the case of girls.
International Widows’ Day works to encourage action in achieving full rights for widows, highlighting the need for more research and statistics into violence, discrimination and poverty suffered by widows and develop policies and programmes to address the problem.
The ultimate goal of the day is to develop resources and policy to empower widows and allow them to have access to education, work, healthcare and live free of violence and abuse. Enabling them to create a life for themselves and their children following the death of their husbands and ending a cycle of poverty and abuse. 
International Widows’ Day is an initiative of the Loomba Foundation, launched at the House of Lords in London on 26 May 2005.
Following the launch, the Loomba Foundation led a five-year global campaign for UN recognition, which resulted in an unanimous decision to adopt International Widows’ Day as an annual global day of action by the UN General Assembly in December 2010.
Since then, International Widows’ Day has provided a focus for campaigning in many countries around the world, with opportunities to create awareness in communities and engage governments in developing effective policies. Much has already been achieved but, as Lord Loomba points out, millions remain in urgent need, and “we’ve barely started yet”.

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