Connect with us

Health

Getting Trimmed Naturally 1

Published

on

There are a lot of misconceptions about weight gain. The first is that weight gain comes from extra calories we do consume that we don’t expend. Experts say we eat too much and exercise little. So if one get fatter then surely he or she must be eating too much.
The other misconception is that once we cut our food then we will naturally become trimmed. All these are hinged on the diet theory, which only works for some time.
Over the past 40 years studies have shown that you can’t get clinically significant effect from cutting down on your calories. Even though experts are saying that sloth is responsible for weight gain- they overlook one basic truth that dieting only works for a short period.
The new study that seems to break those myths about body fat is now revealing some stunning facts. The kind of food we eat makes us fat. Two scientists at University of Pennsylvania, Mitchell Lazar and Cardiologist Allan Sniderman at McGill University all in the USA have shown that that food that we eat often makes us pack in flesh. These include bread, plain baked potatoes, and plain pasta, rice, sweet corn. They confirmed that fatty foods isn’t the enemy but easily digested carbohydrates. While steak, burgers, cheese or sour cream help us lose weight and keep our heart healthy.
This sounds ironical, but it has been discovered that those who do diet and avoid those foods end up getting hungry. What happens is that when you conserve energy or burn less energy, you are bound to add more flesh. Many public health authorities want us to practice energy balance, which is a new way to say that you shouldn’t take more calories than one expends.
No matter how one counts what he or she eats, it is impossible to determine calories and know when we are over board. No matter how good you are at counting calories, you can’t do it. So its couple of sips of soft drinks and few bites of humburger that can make you add weight. That means it at the point when we eat extra than the body want that the body store excess as fat.
The myth of exercising to reduce weight is really making waves. Exercise is helpful but it’s not the main ingredient for fat burning. The phony truth is that the two things we tell people to do in order to lose weight-eat less and exercise more- are the exact two things that make one more hungry. Thus there is need for balance. If one must exercise, then it should be done moderately so as to allow the body to recover the stretch.
The reality is that insulin is the primary hormone that makes one to add weight. If one eats food that spikes insulin like bread, biscuits, sweets, soft drinks. It is refined carbohydrates that raise insulin levels in the body.
To be contd
Explained in simple terms your fat tissue is more like your wallet, and your meals are like going to the ATM. You know how you use the ATM: You put the cash in your wallet and gradually spend it, and when you get too low on cash, you go back to the ATM. It’s the insulin that locks the money in your wallet, so you keep going to the ATM, and your fat cells are getting fatter and fatter. More often you become hungry and you eat again because the insulin can’t get at the fatty acids leading to weight gain.
Low carb diet is key if you are to get trimmed. In Africa where stables are more of carbohydrate it is best to choose those with fibre. It’s difficult to follow the Atkins diet like eating skinless chicken and green salad, melted mozzarella cheese and all those western diet.
An example of a workable diet is to include eggs more often and cut down on processed foods, especially processed carbohydrate. Complex carbohydrate and vegetables have more fibre and makes you get filled quickly. Instead of Irish potato, go for sweet potatoes, oats that have more fibre. I advise people to eat garri than processed plantain and wheat meals. By the way, processed wheat can worsen the body ails.
The other way to go is, to eat low carbohydrate, and that means more of protein, fat, vegetables and complex grains like millet, and beans. With low carbohydrate, one can eat as much and still remain trimmed. A low carbohydrate is better than a low fat, low calorie diet.
Research has shown high fat diet is good for the heart. I don’t mean trans -fat but healthy fats from cheese, milk, olive oil and fish oil. Once your HDL goes up, your LDL goes down and this reduces high cholesterol and inadvertently cuts down excess insulin which is a big factor in fat burning.
The low fat diet which medical authorities promote often in the bid to reduce heart problems is actually bad for the heart as studies reveal. A study published by Readers Digest in February 2011 said, “the public health effort to get everyone to eat that way is one of the fundamental reasons that we now have obesity and diabetes epidemics”.
The strange conclusion is that not everyone gets fat from eating carbohydrates- it has to with how sensitive your fat cells are fight with muscle cells. But the huge percentage of the people who get fat got it in their high carbohydrate diet, especially processed ones. Agreed that getting rid of carbohydrate might not make you lean, but the leanest you can be is on the diet with the fewest carbohydrates.
A low carb diet has lots of health benefits- it can reduce your blood pressure, and it’s advisable to eat more of natural foods than processed foods. Our ancestors ate more of meat, vegetables and fibre from fruits. The fundamental idea is, don’t eat foods that make you fat, beyond that, you can eat as much as you want without much processed carbohydrates.

Continue Reading

Health

55 Million Battle Dementia as WHO PLANS To Check Disease

Published

on

The World Health Organisation(WHO) says currently, more than 55 million people have dementia worldwide with over 60%  living in low- and middle income countries.

It also revealed that every year, there are nearly 10 million new cases.

The revelation came as WHO Assembly endorsed a global action plan on the public health response to dementia 2017-2025.

The goal of the action plan is to improve the lives of people with dementia, their carers and families, while decreasing the impact of dementia on them as well as on communities and countries.

The action plan includes seven strategic action areas, including one on dementia risk reduction,as  there is no cure for dementia currently.

The body stressed that risk reduction for dementia remains critically important with potentially modifiable risk factors means that prevention of dementia is potentially possible by implementing a set of key interventions. This would, in turn, offer opportunities to influence future dementia incidence.

To this end, WHO released guidelines for risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia in 2019. The guidelines provide health care providers as well as governments, policy-makers and other stakeholders with evidence-based recommendations on health  behaviours and interventions to delay or prevent cognitive decline and dementia.

Since the initial release of the guidelines, the field has evolved significantly, with more evidence now being available. In line with WHO standard procedure, the Department of Mental Health, Brain Health and Substance Use has started the process of updating the guidelines for risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia with the advice of a Guideline Development Group (GDG).

Meanwhile, experts are proposing to join the GDG for updating the guidelines for risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia based on their technical expertise, diverse perspectives, demographic background, lived experience and geographic representation

Continue Reading

Health

 NAFDAC Intensifies Action to Check Paraquat, Hazardous chemicals

Published

on

The National Food Food Drug Administration and Control(NAFDAC) has  reiterated its ban on Paraquat agrochemicals, pledging rigorous enforcement, and urges the public to report suspicious activities or products to its nearest office.

The agency during a raid at markets in Sokoto  stated that goods worth over N20 million, including Paraquat were seen around the old market, kara market and central market.

According to the agency, the operation conducted by its Investigation and Enforcement/Federal Task Force on fake drugs and unwholesome processed food led to the arrest of four suspects.

The agency said during the operation it screened 17 shops, seized cartons of “endocoton super containing banned Paraquat.”

“Paraquat is a highly toxic herbicide that poses significant health risks and environmental hazards,” it said.

NAFDAC’s raid resulted in the seizure of 2,096 cartons of SF MOE Soap, 223 cartons of SF Oxxo Purest Soap, and unregistered herbal preparations with pornographic pictorials, posing public health risks.

“The arrested individuals are under investigation, and the confiscated products will be processed according to regulations for substandard and falsified products,” the agency said.

NAFDAC had banned Paraquat agrochemicals, pledging rigorous enforcement, and urges the public to report suspicious activities or products to its nearest office.

 

 

Continue Reading

Health

Who Warns On Lack Of Exercise

Published

on

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned of the consequences of lack activity and exercise by adults.
In a recent data, WHO showed that nearly one third (31%) of adults worldwide, approximately 1.8 billion people, did not meet the recommended levels of physical activity in 2022.
It warned that inactivity puts adults at greater risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes, type 2 diabetes, dementia and cancers such as breast and colon.
” The finding is a worrying trend of physical inactivity among adults, which has increased by about 5 percentage points between 2010 and 2022,” the body said in a statement.
WHOs Director General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus declared that ,” the new findings highlight a lost opportunity to reduce cancer and heart disease, and improve mental health and well-being through increased physical activity,” as he insists that “We must renew our commitment to increasing levels of physical activity and prioritizing bold action, including strengthened policies and increased funding, to reverse this worrying trend.”
If the trend continues, levels of inactivity are projected to further rise to 35% by 2030, and the world is currently off track from meeting the global target to reduce physical inactivity by 2030.
The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that adults have 150 minutes of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity, or equivalent, per week.
The study was undertaken by researchers from WHO together with academic colleagues and published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
The highest rates of physical inactivity were observed in the high-income Asia Pacific region (48%) and South Asia (45%), with levels of inactivity in other regions ranging from 28 percent in high-income Western countries to 14 percent in Oceania.
Of concern is the disparity between gender and age. Physical inactivity is still more common among women globally compared with men, with inactivity rates of 34 percent compared to 29 percent. In some countries, this difference is as much as 20 percentage points. Additionally, people over 60 are less active than other adults, underscoring the importance of promoting physical activity for older adults.

Continue Reading

Trending