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Getting Trimmed Naturally 1

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There are a lot of misconceptions about weight gain. The first is that weight gain comes from extra calories we do consume that we don’t expend. Experts say we eat too much and exercise little. So if one get fatter then surely he or she must be eating too much.
The other misconception is that once we cut our food then we will naturally become trimmed. All these are hinged on the diet theory, which only works for some time.
Over the past 40 years studies have shown that you can’t get clinically significant effect from cutting down on your calories. Even though experts are saying that sloth is responsible for weight gain- they overlook one basic truth that dieting only works for a short period.
The new study that seems to break those myths about body fat is now revealing some stunning facts. The kind of food we eat makes us fat. Two scientists at University of Pennsylvania, Mitchell Lazar and Cardiologist Allan Sniderman at McGill University all in the USA have shown that that food that we eat often makes us pack in flesh. These include bread, plain baked potatoes, and plain pasta, rice, sweet corn. They confirmed that fatty foods isn’t the enemy but easily digested carbohydrates. While steak, burgers, cheese or sour cream help us lose weight and keep our heart healthy.
This sounds ironical, but it has been discovered that those who do diet and avoid those foods end up getting hungry. What happens is that when you conserve energy or burn less energy, you are bound to add more flesh. Many public health authorities want us to practice energy balance, which is a new way to say that you shouldn’t take more calories than one expends.
No matter how one counts what he or she eats, it is impossible to determine calories and know when we are over board. No matter how good you are at counting calories, you can’t do it. So its couple of sips of soft drinks and few bites of humburger that can make you add weight. That means it at the point when we eat extra than the body want that the body store excess as fat.
The myth of exercising to reduce weight is really making waves. Exercise is helpful but it’s not the main ingredient for fat burning. The phony truth is that the two things we tell people to do in order to lose weight-eat less and exercise more- are the exact two things that make one more hungry. Thus there is need for balance. If one must exercise, then it should be done moderately so as to allow the body to recover the stretch.
The reality is that insulin is the primary hormone that makes one to add weight. If one eats food that spikes insulin like bread, biscuits, sweets, soft drinks. It is refined carbohydrates that raise insulin levels in the body.
To be contd
Explained in simple terms your fat tissue is more like your wallet, and your meals are like going to the ATM. You know how you use the ATM: You put the cash in your wallet and gradually spend it, and when you get too low on cash, you go back to the ATM. It’s the insulin that locks the money in your wallet, so you keep going to the ATM, and your fat cells are getting fatter and fatter. More often you become hungry and you eat again because the insulin can’t get at the fatty acids leading to weight gain.
Low carb diet is key if you are to get trimmed. In Africa where stables are more of carbohydrate it is best to choose those with fibre. It’s difficult to follow the Atkins diet like eating skinless chicken and green salad, melted mozzarella cheese and all those western diet.
An example of a workable diet is to include eggs more often and cut down on processed foods, especially processed carbohydrate. Complex carbohydrate and vegetables have more fibre and makes you get filled quickly. Instead of Irish potato, go for sweet potatoes, oats that have more fibre. I advise people to eat garri than processed plantain and wheat meals. By the way, processed wheat can worsen the body ails.
The other way to go is, to eat low carbohydrate, and that means more of protein, fat, vegetables and complex grains like millet, and beans. With low carbohydrate, one can eat as much and still remain trimmed. A low carbohydrate is better than a low fat, low calorie diet.
Research has shown high fat diet is good for the heart. I don’t mean trans -fat but healthy fats from cheese, milk, olive oil and fish oil. Once your HDL goes up, your LDL goes down and this reduces high cholesterol and inadvertently cuts down excess insulin which is a big factor in fat burning.
The low fat diet which medical authorities promote often in the bid to reduce heart problems is actually bad for the heart as studies reveal. A study published by Readers Digest in February 2011 said, “the public health effort to get everyone to eat that way is one of the fundamental reasons that we now have obesity and diabetes epidemics”.
The strange conclusion is that not everyone gets fat from eating carbohydrates- it has to with how sensitive your fat cells are fight with muscle cells. But the huge percentage of the people who get fat got it in their high carbohydrate diet, especially processed ones. Agreed that getting rid of carbohydrate might not make you lean, but the leanest you can be is on the diet with the fewest carbohydrates.
A low carb diet has lots of health benefits- it can reduce your blood pressure, and it’s advisable to eat more of natural foods than processed foods. Our ancestors ate more of meat, vegetables and fibre from fruits. The fundamental idea is, don’t eat foods that make you fat, beyond that, you can eat as much as you want without much processed carbohydrates.

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8 Simple Tips To Have A Healthy Year

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This year is already on to the second month and its moving at a speed that may take many off balance as they push for the rat race, and how to have the best year possible.
Unfortunately, many people put health behind, thinking that life will take care of itself but that never happens. Normally, health priority number one should be taking care of oneself.
Below are shared health tips to help you make the most of this 2023:
1. Get a Check-up
When you visit your doctor or the hospital for your annual check-up, he or she should screen for the vitals like: high blood pressure and cholesterol and abnormal glucose(Sugar levels) or lipid levels. Your doctor will also make sure you’re at a healthy weight and up-to-date on your immunizations and check for potentially dangerous skin lesions.
2. Stop Smoking
Smoking not only damages your lungs, it also increases your risk for heart attack, bladder cancer and even erectile dysfunction. Talk to your doctor about options to help you quit smoking, including medications, patches or a smoking cessation.
3.Avoid Too Much but Embrace Early Morn Sun
The benefit of early morning sun is  Vitamin D and to improve mood. However, too much sun can be damaging. Try getting early morning sun at least twice a week from 7-10am.
4. Get Moving
If you haven’t adopted a routine of regular exercise, this year is the time to do it. Commit to exercising at least 30 minutes, 3 days a week to help keep your weight controlled, reduce your stress and stay healthy. You don’t have to be an extreme athlete; choose to take the stairs instead of an elevator, do stretches during the commercials of your favorite TV show, or go for a walk around your neighborhood.
5.Watch What You Eat
Take a new look at healthy eating by thinking about all the food you can eat, not what you “can’t” eat. Make sure you’re getting enough fruits and vegetables, calcium, whole grains and lean protein in your daily diet. Experiment with cooking old favorites in a different, healthier way, like baking chicken instead of frying it or grilling fish instead of sautéing it.
6.Commit to Better Sleep
Getting good quality sleep, and enough of it, plays a big role in your overall health. Make sure you’re getting at least 7 hours a night and try to go to bed and wake up at the same times each day. Create a bedroom that’s conducive to good sleep by making it dark and quiet and removing electronics like televisions, computers and cell phones.
7.Adopt a Hand-washing Routine
In this period of Covid and other contaminables regular hand washing is the number one way to protect yourself against illness. Always wash your hands after using the bathroom, before preparing and eating foods, after blowing your nose or coughing, when you are around someone who is sick and after caring for animals. Make sure you’re using warm water, lathering the soap and scrubbing, rinsing and drying.
8.Make Time for a Break
Simply put rest most often. These days we’re all moving a mile a minute, and “multi-tasking” is a popular buzz word. Taking short breaks from work throughout your day can reduce stress on your mind and body. So, get up from your desk and take a walk around the office; do some light stretching at lunch; or take a break to chat with a coworker around the water cooler.

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WHO Raises Alarm Over Fake Drugs On Children

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The World Health Organisation(WHO) has made an urgent call  to countries to prevent, detect and respond to incidents of substandard and falsified medical products on children.
Over the past four months, it said many countries have reported of several incidents of over-the-counter cough syrups for children with confirmed or suspected contamination with high levels of diethylene glycol (DEG) and ethylene glycol (EG).
It said,”The cases are from at least seven countries, associated with more than 300 fatalities in three of these countries. Most are young children under the age of five. These contaminants are toxic chemicals used as industrial solvents and antifreeze agents that can be fatal even taken in small amounts, and should never be found in medicines.”
Based on country reports, the world apex health body issued three global medical alerts addressing these incidents.
WHO’s medical product alerts were rapidly. disseminated to the national health authorities of all 194 WHO Member States.
These medical product alerts requested,  the detection and removal of contaminated medicines from circulation in the markets, increased surveillance and diligence within the supply chains of countries and regions likely to be affected,  immediate notification to WHO if these substandard products are discovered in-country.
It called on various key stakeholders engaged in the medical supply chain to take immediate and coordinated action.
Calling on regulators and governments to detect and remove from circulation in their respective markets any substandard medical products, WHO urged  that all medical products in the respective markets are those approved for sale by competent authorities and obtainable from authorised/licensed suppliers.
It urged the appropriate authorities to improve and increase risk-based inspections of manufacturing sites within their jurisdiction in accordance with international norms and standards.
Further stressing increased need for market surveillance including risk-based targeted testing for medical products released in their respective markets including informal markets;it emphasised the need to enact and enforce, where relevant and as appropriate, laws and other relevant legal measures to help combat the manufacture, distribution and/or use of substandard and falsified medicines.

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NGO Trains Healthcare Workers On Effective Handling Of SGBV Cases

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The Abiodun Essiet Initiative for Girls (AEIG), an NGO, trained no fewer than 40 healthcare workers and members of Community Development Committee (CDC) on effective handling of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence (SGBV) cases in their communities.
The Tide source reports that the participants were drawn from various primary health care centres in Abuja Municipal Area Council (AMAC) and Bwari Area Council of the FCT.
The theme of the training is; “Strengthening the Capacity of PHCs and Ward Development Committees on SGBV Case Management and Access to Efficient Healthcare Service Delivery.”
Mrs Abiodun Essiet, the Executive Director of AEIG, said the training was aimed at improving the knowledge of  healthcare workers on how to effectively manage cases of SGBV in their centres.
She added that “the training focuses on proper documentation, management and non-tampering of evidences, which will assist in the prosecution of perpetrators.
“Healthcare workers are frontliners that manage SGBV cases and other people interact with them to share ideas with them, so, it is important that we re-orient them about their position and how they can handle these cases.
“Our project goal is to strengthen traditional justice system to effectively combat SGBV, and so far, we have done that across the area councils last year.
“What we are doing now is to train healthcare workers who will be interfacing with community development committee members in the various communities.
“These are issues of paramount concern to communities where most of the original inhabitants of the FCT are, as it is only the primary health centres that they can access care.
“So we want to work together with the healthcare facilities and ensure that the original inhabitants of the FCT are better served.”
Dr Laz Eze, the Founder, Make Our Hospital Work Campaign, stressed the need for primary healthcare facilities to be accessible and affordable to the people.
Eze, who spoke on; “Promoting Health Care Delivery: The Role of Primary Health Care”, added that PHCs were important in the areas of education, prevention, as well as physical and psycho-social response to SGBV survivors.
He added that drastic measures must also be taken by communities to ensure that SGBV cases were reported to the right authorities.

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